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    Rights statement: "This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an article published in Families, Relationships and Societies. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: [insert URL here]

    Accepted author manuscript, 678 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 28/05/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Disguised compliance or undisguised nonsense?: A critical discourse analysis of compliance and resistance in social work practice.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>28/05/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Families, Relationships and Societies
Number of pages27
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date28/05/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This article examines how the term disguised compliance first emerged and developed into the popular catchphrase that is used in practice today. Using critical discourse analysis, we explore how language affects practice and how social workers draw on a predetermined concept to rationalise concerns relating to parental resistance. We contend that concepts such as disguised compliance are misleading as they do not improve social workers’ abilities in detecting resistance or compliance. Instead, we argue that social workers should be cautious when using popular mantras which on the surface appear effective in describing parents’ behaviours but, in reality, conceal concerns relating to risk, accountability and blame. This study differs from the current literature which advocates social workers should be aware of disguised compliance by shifting the emphasis away from the behaviours of parents and towards acknowledging the power such discursive activities can have on practice.

Bibliographic note

"This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an article published in Families, Relationships and Societies. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: [insert URL here]