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    Rights statement: © 2019 Leigh, Jadwiga; Beddoe, Liz; Keddell, Emily. The definitive, peer reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Families, Relationships and Societies, Volume 9, Number 2, pp. 269-285, 2020, DOI 10.1332/204674319X15536730156921

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Disguised compliance or undisguised nonsense?: A critical discourse analysis of compliance and resistance in social work practice.

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Disguised compliance or undisguised nonsense? A critical discourse analysis of compliance and resistance in social work practice. . / Leigh, Jadwiga; Beddoe, Liz; Keddell, Emily.

In: Families, Relationships and Societies, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.07.2020, p. 269-285.

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Leigh, Jadwiga ; Beddoe, Liz ; Keddell, Emily. / Disguised compliance or undisguised nonsense? A critical discourse analysis of compliance and resistance in social work practice. . In: Families, Relationships and Societies. 2020 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 269-285.

Bibtex

@article{bf4b15d69fc44594bf809e9e672ea918,
title = "Disguised compliance or undisguised nonsense?: A critical discourse analysis of compliance and resistance in social work practice. ",
abstract = "This article examines how the term disguised compliance first emerged and developed into the popular catchphrase that is used in practice today. Using critical discourse analysis, we explore how language affects practice and how social workers draw on a predetermined concept to rationalise concerns relating to parental resistance. We contend that concepts such as disguised compliance are misleading as they do not improve social workers{\textquoteright} abilities in detecting resistance or compliance. Instead, we argue that social workers should be cautious when using popular mantras which on the surface appear effective in describing parents{\textquoteright} behaviours but, in reality, conceal concerns relating to risk, accountability and blame. This study differs from the current literature which advocates social workers should be aware of disguised compliance by shifting the emphasis away from the behaviours of parents and towards acknowledging the power such discursive activities can have on practice. ",
keywords = "Disguised compliance, resistance, Affect, Risk, Discourse, Accountability",
author = "Jadwiga Leigh and Liz Beddoe and Emily Keddell",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2019 Leigh, Jadwiga; Beddoe, Liz; Keddell, Emily. The definitive, peer reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Families, Relationships and Societies, Volume 9, Number 2, pp. 269-285, 2020, DOI 10.1332/204674319X15536730156921",
year = "2020",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1332/204674319X15536730156921",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "269--285",
journal = "Families, Relationships and Societies",
issn = "2046-7435",
publisher = "The Policy Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disguised compliance or undisguised nonsense?

T2 - A critical discourse analysis of compliance and resistance in social work practice.

AU - Leigh, Jadwiga

AU - Beddoe, Liz

AU - Keddell, Emily

N1 - © 2019 Leigh, Jadwiga; Beddoe, Liz; Keddell, Emily. The definitive, peer reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Families, Relationships and Societies, Volume 9, Number 2, pp. 269-285, 2020, DOI 10.1332/204674319X15536730156921

PY - 2020/7/1

Y1 - 2020/7/1

N2 - This article examines how the term disguised compliance first emerged and developed into the popular catchphrase that is used in practice today. Using critical discourse analysis, we explore how language affects practice and how social workers draw on a predetermined concept to rationalise concerns relating to parental resistance. We contend that concepts such as disguised compliance are misleading as they do not improve social workers’ abilities in detecting resistance or compliance. Instead, we argue that social workers should be cautious when using popular mantras which on the surface appear effective in describing parents’ behaviours but, in reality, conceal concerns relating to risk, accountability and blame. This study differs from the current literature which advocates social workers should be aware of disguised compliance by shifting the emphasis away from the behaviours of parents and towards acknowledging the power such discursive activities can have on practice.

AB - This article examines how the term disguised compliance first emerged and developed into the popular catchphrase that is used in practice today. Using critical discourse analysis, we explore how language affects practice and how social workers draw on a predetermined concept to rationalise concerns relating to parental resistance. We contend that concepts such as disguised compliance are misleading as they do not improve social workers’ abilities in detecting resistance or compliance. Instead, we argue that social workers should be cautious when using popular mantras which on the surface appear effective in describing parents’ behaviours but, in reality, conceal concerns relating to risk, accountability and blame. This study differs from the current literature which advocates social workers should be aware of disguised compliance by shifting the emphasis away from the behaviours of parents and towards acknowledging the power such discursive activities can have on practice.

KW - Disguised compliance

KW - resistance

KW - Affect

KW - Risk

KW - Discourse

KW - Accountability

U2 - 10.1332/204674319X15536730156921

DO - 10.1332/204674319X15536730156921

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - 269

EP - 285

JO - Families, Relationships and Societies

JF - Families, Relationships and Societies

SN - 2046-7435

IS - 2

ER -