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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Economics of Education Review. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Economics of Education Review, 63, 1, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2018.02.004

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Does greater primary school autonomy improve pupil attainment?: Evidence from primary school converter academies in England

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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  • Joe Regan-Stansfield
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Article number11
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>04/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Economics of Education Review
Issue number1
Volume63
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)167-179
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date27/02/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

A recent English education policy has been to encourage state primary schools to become academies: state-funded, non-selective, and highly autonomous establishments. Primary schools have been able to opt-in to academy status since 2010 and academies now account for twenty-one percent of the primary sector. This paper investigates the causal effect of becoming a converter academy on primary school assessment outcomes, and on entry-year intake composition. Unlike existing evidence focused on earlier academies formed from failing secondary schools, no evidence is found of a converter academy effect on attainment for the average pupil. Although, there is evidence of a slight positive effect on age 11 attainment for pupils eligible for free school meals. There is no evidence that becoming a converter academy affects the composition of the entry-year intake.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Economics of Education Review. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Economics of Education Review, 63, 1, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2018.02.004