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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 31/01/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13528165.2018.1558436

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Drift as a planetary phenomenon

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Drift as a planetary phenomenon. / Szerszynski, Bronislaw.

In: Performance Research, Vol. 23, No. 7, 01.06.2019, p. 136-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Szerszynski, B 2019, 'Drift as a planetary phenomenon', Performance Research, vol. 23, no. 7, pp. 136-144. https://doi.org/10.1080/13528165.2018.1558436

APA

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Szerszynski, Bronislaw. / Drift as a planetary phenomenon. In: Performance Research. 2019 ; Vol. 23, No. 7. pp. 136-144.

Bibtex

@article{ea3c3824279b427387458ccc893598f8,
title = "Drift as a planetary phenomenon",
abstract = "In this paper I situate the Situationists' derive within an analysis of drift as a planetary phenomenon. Using the concept of the middle voice', I suggest that drifting can lead us to a deeper understanding of the way that all things move, that move within the extended body of the Earth. I develop the idea of driftwork', in which drift is subsumed within a wider set of purposes or functions, and describe different forms of more-than-human driftwork, with different political implications. I conclude by suggesting that things adrift can help us trace the lineaments of a planetary ethic: an ethic that extends beyond the human, the animal, and the living to the whole extended body of the Earth; that allows us to recontextualize human practices of drifting within a planetary context; that is sensitive to the debt that all moving things owe to the planetary mobility commons that enables their motion; and that helps us to recognize our obligations of care towards all drifting things.",
keywords = "drift, mobility, Situationism, motion, planetarity",
author = "Bronislaw Szerszynski",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 31/01/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13528165.2018.1558436",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/13528165.2018.1558436",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "136--144",
journal = "Performance Research",
issn = "1352-8165",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Drift as a planetary phenomenon

AU - Szerszynski, Bronislaw

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 31/01/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13528165.2018.1558436

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - In this paper I situate the Situationists' derive within an analysis of drift as a planetary phenomenon. Using the concept of the middle voice', I suggest that drifting can lead us to a deeper understanding of the way that all things move, that move within the extended body of the Earth. I develop the idea of driftwork', in which drift is subsumed within a wider set of purposes or functions, and describe different forms of more-than-human driftwork, with different political implications. I conclude by suggesting that things adrift can help us trace the lineaments of a planetary ethic: an ethic that extends beyond the human, the animal, and the living to the whole extended body of the Earth; that allows us to recontextualize human practices of drifting within a planetary context; that is sensitive to the debt that all moving things owe to the planetary mobility commons that enables their motion; and that helps us to recognize our obligations of care towards all drifting things.

AB - In this paper I situate the Situationists' derive within an analysis of drift as a planetary phenomenon. Using the concept of the middle voice', I suggest that drifting can lead us to a deeper understanding of the way that all things move, that move within the extended body of the Earth. I develop the idea of driftwork', in which drift is subsumed within a wider set of purposes or functions, and describe different forms of more-than-human driftwork, with different political implications. I conclude by suggesting that things adrift can help us trace the lineaments of a planetary ethic: an ethic that extends beyond the human, the animal, and the living to the whole extended body of the Earth; that allows us to recontextualize human practices of drifting within a planetary context; that is sensitive to the debt that all moving things owe to the planetary mobility commons that enables their motion; and that helps us to recognize our obligations of care towards all drifting things.

KW - drift

KW - mobility

KW - Situationism

KW - motion

KW - planetarity

U2 - 10.1080/13528165.2018.1558436

DO - 10.1080/13528165.2018.1558436

M3 - Journal article

VL - 23

SP - 136

EP - 144

JO - Performance Research

JF - Performance Research

SN - 1352-8165

IS - 7

ER -