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Effect of equilibration time on estimates of the maximum phosphorus sorption capacity of industrial by-products using the Langmuir model

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Effect of equilibration time on estimates of the maximum phosphorus sorption capacity of industrial by-products using the Langmuir model. / Habibiandehkordi, Reza; Quinton, John; Surridge, Ben.

In: Journal of Soils and Sediments, Vol. 14, No. 11, 11.2014, p. 1818-1828.

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@article{67fb38fce7a74ecebd0ad613055b117a,
title = "Effect of equilibration time on estimates of the maximum phosphorus sorption capacity of industrial by-products using the Langmuir model",
abstract = "PurposeUsing reactive industrial by-products (IBPs) to reduce phosphorus (P) losses associated with diffuse water pollution is a potentially cost-effective mitigation strategy. However, IBPs must be screened to assess their effectiveness and optimum application rates. This requires accurate estimates of parameters such as the maximum P sorption capacity. Traditionally, these parameters have been derived from the Langmuir model applied to data from batch sorption experiments following a 24-h equilibration period. In this paper, we examined (i) how equilibration time can influence estimates of the maximum P sorption capacity for IBPs and (ii) the relative P sorption characteristics of a range of IBPs available in the UK.Materials and methodsFour IBPs containing different reactive components including ochre, aluminium (Al)-based water treatment residual (WTR), iron (Fe)-based WTR and Fe-lime (CaO)-based WTR were selected for this study. The maximum P sorption capacities of these IBPs were determined using a linearized Langmuir model applied to batch sorption data collected at different equilibration times of 24 h, 5 days and 10 days.Results and discussionThe maximum P sorption capacity of ochre, Al-based WTR, Fe-based WTR and Fe-CaO-based WTR estimated from the linearized Langmuir model following a 24-h equilibration period was 10.1, 13.7, 2.4 and 9.3 mg P g−1, respectively. However, extending the equilibration time from 24 h to 5 days increased the estimated maximum P sorption capacity for these IBPs by factors of 2.2, 2.1, 6.8 and 2.3, respectively. No significant increase was found in estimates of the maximum P sorption capacity when further extending the equilibration time to 10 days.ConclusionsA minimum equilibration period of 5 days is recommended to avoid underestimating the maximum P sorption capacity of the IBPs examined in this paper. Each of the IBPs we evaluated was able to sorb P from solution, although with variable capacity (maximum sorption capacity after 5 days of equilibration ranged from 16.3–28.5 mg P g−1). These findings emphasise the importance of accurate quantification of the P sorption capacity of IBPs before application.",
keywords = "Equilibration time, Industrial by-products, Langmuir model, Phosphorus, Sorption, Water quality",
author = "Reza Habibiandehkordi and John Quinton and Ben Surridge",
year = "2014",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1007/s11368-014-0936-y",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "1818--1828",
journal = "Journal of Soils and Sediments",
issn = "1439-0108",
publisher = "Springer Science + Business Media",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of equilibration time on estimates of the maximum phosphorus sorption capacity of industrial by-products using the Langmuir model

AU - Habibiandehkordi, Reza

AU - Quinton, John

AU - Surridge, Ben

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - PurposeUsing reactive industrial by-products (IBPs) to reduce phosphorus (P) losses associated with diffuse water pollution is a potentially cost-effective mitigation strategy. However, IBPs must be screened to assess their effectiveness and optimum application rates. This requires accurate estimates of parameters such as the maximum P sorption capacity. Traditionally, these parameters have been derived from the Langmuir model applied to data from batch sorption experiments following a 24-h equilibration period. In this paper, we examined (i) how equilibration time can influence estimates of the maximum P sorption capacity for IBPs and (ii) the relative P sorption characteristics of a range of IBPs available in the UK.Materials and methodsFour IBPs containing different reactive components including ochre, aluminium (Al)-based water treatment residual (WTR), iron (Fe)-based WTR and Fe-lime (CaO)-based WTR were selected for this study. The maximum P sorption capacities of these IBPs were determined using a linearized Langmuir model applied to batch sorption data collected at different equilibration times of 24 h, 5 days and 10 days.Results and discussionThe maximum P sorption capacity of ochre, Al-based WTR, Fe-based WTR and Fe-CaO-based WTR estimated from the linearized Langmuir model following a 24-h equilibration period was 10.1, 13.7, 2.4 and 9.3 mg P g−1, respectively. However, extending the equilibration time from 24 h to 5 days increased the estimated maximum P sorption capacity for these IBPs by factors of 2.2, 2.1, 6.8 and 2.3, respectively. No significant increase was found in estimates of the maximum P sorption capacity when further extending the equilibration time to 10 days.ConclusionsA minimum equilibration period of 5 days is recommended to avoid underestimating the maximum P sorption capacity of the IBPs examined in this paper. Each of the IBPs we evaluated was able to sorb P from solution, although with variable capacity (maximum sorption capacity after 5 days of equilibration ranged from 16.3–28.5 mg P g−1). These findings emphasise the importance of accurate quantification of the P sorption capacity of IBPs before application.

AB - PurposeUsing reactive industrial by-products (IBPs) to reduce phosphorus (P) losses associated with diffuse water pollution is a potentially cost-effective mitigation strategy. However, IBPs must be screened to assess their effectiveness and optimum application rates. This requires accurate estimates of parameters such as the maximum P sorption capacity. Traditionally, these parameters have been derived from the Langmuir model applied to data from batch sorption experiments following a 24-h equilibration period. In this paper, we examined (i) how equilibration time can influence estimates of the maximum P sorption capacity for IBPs and (ii) the relative P sorption characteristics of a range of IBPs available in the UK.Materials and methodsFour IBPs containing different reactive components including ochre, aluminium (Al)-based water treatment residual (WTR), iron (Fe)-based WTR and Fe-lime (CaO)-based WTR were selected for this study. The maximum P sorption capacities of these IBPs were determined using a linearized Langmuir model applied to batch sorption data collected at different equilibration times of 24 h, 5 days and 10 days.Results and discussionThe maximum P sorption capacity of ochre, Al-based WTR, Fe-based WTR and Fe-CaO-based WTR estimated from the linearized Langmuir model following a 24-h equilibration period was 10.1, 13.7, 2.4 and 9.3 mg P g−1, respectively. However, extending the equilibration time from 24 h to 5 days increased the estimated maximum P sorption capacity for these IBPs by factors of 2.2, 2.1, 6.8 and 2.3, respectively. No significant increase was found in estimates of the maximum P sorption capacity when further extending the equilibration time to 10 days.ConclusionsA minimum equilibration period of 5 days is recommended to avoid underestimating the maximum P sorption capacity of the IBPs examined in this paper. Each of the IBPs we evaluated was able to sorb P from solution, although with variable capacity (maximum sorption capacity after 5 days of equilibration ranged from 16.3–28.5 mg P g−1). These findings emphasise the importance of accurate quantification of the P sorption capacity of IBPs before application.

KW - Equilibration time

KW - Industrial by-products

KW - Langmuir model

KW - Phosphorus

KW - Sorption

KW - Water quality

U2 - 10.1007/s11368-014-0936-y

DO - 10.1007/s11368-014-0936-y

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 1818

EP - 1828

JO - Journal of Soils and Sediments

JF - Journal of Soils and Sediments

SN - 1439-0108

IS - 11

ER -