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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Liu, J, Kang, S, Davies, WJ, Ding, R. Elevated [CO2] alleviates the impacts of water deficit on xylem anatomy and hydraulic properties of maize stems. Plant Cell Environ. 2020; 43: 563– 578. https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.13677 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/pce.13677 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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    Embargo ends: 9/12/20

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Elevated [CO2] alleviates the impacts of water deficit on xylem anatomy and hydraulic properties of maize stems

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/03/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Plant, Cell and Environment
Issue number3
Volume43
Number of pages16
Pages (from-to)563-578
Publication statusPublished
Early online date9/12/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Plants can modify xylem anatomy and hydraulic properties to adjust to water status. Elevated [CO2] can increase plant water potential via reduced stomatal conductance and water loss. This raises the question of whether elevated [CO2], which thus improves plant water status, will reduce the impacts of soil water deficit on xylem anatomy and hydraulic properties of plants. To analyse the impacts of water and [CO2] on maize stem xylem anatomy and hydraulic properties, we exposed potted maize plants to varying [CO2] levels (400, 700, 900, and 1,200 ppm) and water levels (full irrigation and deficit irrigation). Results showed that at current [CO2], vessel diameter, vessel roundness, stem cross‐section area, specific hydraulic conductivity, and vulnerability to embolism decreased under deficit irrigation; yet, these impacts of deficit irrigation were reduced at elevated [CO2]. Across all treatments, midday stem water potential was tightly correlated with xylem traits and displayed similar responses. A distinct trade‐off between efficiency and safety in stem xylem water transportation in response to water deficit was observed at current [CO2] but not observed at elevated [CO2]. The results of this study enhance our knowledge of plant hydraulic acclimation under future climate environments and provide insights into trade‐offs in xylem structure and function.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Liu, J, Kang, S, Davies, WJ, Ding, R. Elevated [CO2] alleviates the impacts of water deficit on xylem anatomy and hydraulic properties of maize stems. Plant Cell Environ. 2020; 43: 563– 578. https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.13677 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/pce.13677 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.