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Embodiment in brain-computer interaction

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Embodiment in brain-computer interaction. / O'Hara, K.; Sellen, A.; Harper, R.

CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : ACM, 2011. p. 353-362.

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNConference contribution/Paper

Harvard

O'Hara, K, Sellen, A & Harper, R 2011, Embodiment in brain-computer interaction. in CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York, pp. 353-362. https://doi.org/10.1145/1978942.1978994

APA

O'Hara, K., Sellen, A., & Harper, R. (2011). Embodiment in brain-computer interaction. In CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 353-362). ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1978942.1978994

Vancouver

O'Hara K, Sellen A, Harper R. Embodiment in brain-computer interaction. In CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York: ACM. 2011. p. 353-362 https://doi.org/10.1145/1978942.1978994

Author

O'Hara, K. ; Sellen, A. ; Harper, R. / Embodiment in brain-computer interaction. CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : ACM, 2011. pp. 353-362

Bibtex

@inproceedings{921fce9f163347e099215f4646f86ae2,
title = "Embodiment in brain-computer interaction",
abstract = "With emerging opportunities for using Brain-Computer Interaction (BCI) in gaming applications, there is a need to understand the opportunities and constraints of this interaction paradigm. To complement existing laboratory-based studies, there is also a call for the study of BCI in real world contexts. We present such a real world study of a simple BCI game called MindFlex{\textregistered}, played as a social activity in the home. In particular, drawing on the philosophical traditions of embodied interaction, we highlight the importance of considering the body in BCI and not simply what is going on in the head. The study shows how people use bodily actions to facilitate control of brain activity but also to make their actions and intentions visible to, and interpretable by, others playing and watching the game. It is the public availability of these bodily actions during BCI that allows action to be socially organised, understood and coordinated with others and through which social relationships can be played out. We discuss the implications of this perspective and findings for BCI. Copyright 2011 ACM.",
keywords = "Brain-Computer Interaction, Embodied interaction, Gaming, Brain activity, Interaction paradigm, Social activities, Social relationships, Brain, Brain computer interface, Human engineering, Philosophical aspects, Human computer interaction",
author = "K. O'Hara and A. Sellen and R. Harper",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1145/1978942.1978994",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781450302289",
pages = "353--362",
booktitle = "CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems",
publisher = "ACM",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Embodiment in brain-computer interaction

AU - O'Hara, K.

AU - Sellen, A.

AU - Harper, R.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - With emerging opportunities for using Brain-Computer Interaction (BCI) in gaming applications, there is a need to understand the opportunities and constraints of this interaction paradigm. To complement existing laboratory-based studies, there is also a call for the study of BCI in real world contexts. We present such a real world study of a simple BCI game called MindFlex®, played as a social activity in the home. In particular, drawing on the philosophical traditions of embodied interaction, we highlight the importance of considering the body in BCI and not simply what is going on in the head. The study shows how people use bodily actions to facilitate control of brain activity but also to make their actions and intentions visible to, and interpretable by, others playing and watching the game. It is the public availability of these bodily actions during BCI that allows action to be socially organised, understood and coordinated with others and through which social relationships can be played out. We discuss the implications of this perspective and findings for BCI. Copyright 2011 ACM.

AB - With emerging opportunities for using Brain-Computer Interaction (BCI) in gaming applications, there is a need to understand the opportunities and constraints of this interaction paradigm. To complement existing laboratory-based studies, there is also a call for the study of BCI in real world contexts. We present such a real world study of a simple BCI game called MindFlex®, played as a social activity in the home. In particular, drawing on the philosophical traditions of embodied interaction, we highlight the importance of considering the body in BCI and not simply what is going on in the head. The study shows how people use bodily actions to facilitate control of brain activity but also to make their actions and intentions visible to, and interpretable by, others playing and watching the game. It is the public availability of these bodily actions during BCI that allows action to be socially organised, understood and coordinated with others and through which social relationships can be played out. We discuss the implications of this perspective and findings for BCI. Copyright 2011 ACM.

KW - Brain-Computer Interaction

KW - Embodied interaction

KW - Gaming

KW - Brain activity

KW - Interaction paradigm

KW - Social activities

KW - Social relationships

KW - Brain

KW - Brain computer interface

KW - Human engineering

KW - Philosophical aspects

KW - Human computer interaction

U2 - 10.1145/1978942.1978994

DO - 10.1145/1978942.1978994

M3 - Conference contribution/Paper

SN - 9781450302289

SP - 353

EP - 362

BT - CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

PB - ACM

CY - New York

ER -