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Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change

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Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change. / Cinner, Joshua E.; Huchery, Cindy; Darling, Emily S.; Humphries, Austin T.; Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Hicks, Christina C.; Marshall, Nadine; McClanahan, Tim R.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 8, No. 9, 74321, 11.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Cinner, JE, Huchery, C, Darling, ES, Humphries, AT, Graham, NAJ, Hicks, CC, Marshall, N & McClanahan, TR 2013, 'Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change', PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 9, 74321. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074321

APA

Cinner, J. E., Huchery, C., Darling, E. S., Humphries, A. T., Graham, N. A. J., Hicks, C. C., Marshall, N., & McClanahan, T. R. (2013). Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change. PLoS ONE, 8(9), [74321]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074321

Vancouver

Author

Cinner, Joshua E. ; Huchery, Cindy ; Darling, Emily S. ; Humphries, Austin T. ; Graham, Nicholas A. J. ; Hicks, Christina C. ; Marshall, Nadine ; McClanahan, Tim R. / Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change. In: PLoS ONE. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 9.

Bibtex

@article{84a032feca49413dba4a27d198fab758,
title = "Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change",
abstract = "There is an increasing need to evaluate the links between the social and ecological dimensions of human vulnerability to climate change. We use an empirical case study of 12 coastal communities and associated coral reefs in Kenya to assess and compare five key ecological and social components of the vulnerability of coastal social-ecological systems to temperature induced coral mortality [specifically: 1) environmental exposure; 2) ecological sensitivity; 3) ecological recovery potential; 4) social sensitivity; and 5) social adaptive capacity]. We examined whether ecological components of vulnerability varied between government operated no-take marine reserves, community-based reserves, and openly fished areas. Overall, fished sites were marginally more vulnerable than community-based and government marine reserves. Social sensitivity was indicated by the occupational composition of each community, including the importance of fishing relative to other occupations, as well as the susceptibility of different fishing gears to the effects of coral bleaching on target fish species. Key components of social adaptive capacity varied considerably between the communities. Together, these results show that different communities have relative strengths and weaknesses in terms of social-ecological vulnerability to climate change.",
keywords = "ADAPTIVE CAPACITY, RESILIENCE, IMPACTS, ADAPTATION, SYSTEMS, COMANAGEMENT, COMMUNITIES, PERSPECTIVE, ECOSYSTEMS, MANAGEMENT",
author = "Cinner, {Joshua E.} and Cindy Huchery and Darling, {Emily S.} and Humphries, {Austin T.} and Graham, {Nicholas A. J.} and Hicks, {Christina C.} and Nadine Marshall and McClanahan, {Tim R.}",
year = "2013",
month = sep
day = "11",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0074321",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "PLoS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluating social and ecological vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to climate change

AU - Cinner, Joshua E.

AU - Huchery, Cindy

AU - Darling, Emily S.

AU - Humphries, Austin T.

AU - Graham, Nicholas A. J.

AU - Hicks, Christina C.

AU - Marshall, Nadine

AU - McClanahan, Tim R.

PY - 2013/9/11

Y1 - 2013/9/11

N2 - There is an increasing need to evaluate the links between the social and ecological dimensions of human vulnerability to climate change. We use an empirical case study of 12 coastal communities and associated coral reefs in Kenya to assess and compare five key ecological and social components of the vulnerability of coastal social-ecological systems to temperature induced coral mortality [specifically: 1) environmental exposure; 2) ecological sensitivity; 3) ecological recovery potential; 4) social sensitivity; and 5) social adaptive capacity]. We examined whether ecological components of vulnerability varied between government operated no-take marine reserves, community-based reserves, and openly fished areas. Overall, fished sites were marginally more vulnerable than community-based and government marine reserves. Social sensitivity was indicated by the occupational composition of each community, including the importance of fishing relative to other occupations, as well as the susceptibility of different fishing gears to the effects of coral bleaching on target fish species. Key components of social adaptive capacity varied considerably between the communities. Together, these results show that different communities have relative strengths and weaknesses in terms of social-ecological vulnerability to climate change.

AB - There is an increasing need to evaluate the links between the social and ecological dimensions of human vulnerability to climate change. We use an empirical case study of 12 coastal communities and associated coral reefs in Kenya to assess and compare five key ecological and social components of the vulnerability of coastal social-ecological systems to temperature induced coral mortality [specifically: 1) environmental exposure; 2) ecological sensitivity; 3) ecological recovery potential; 4) social sensitivity; and 5) social adaptive capacity]. We examined whether ecological components of vulnerability varied between government operated no-take marine reserves, community-based reserves, and openly fished areas. Overall, fished sites were marginally more vulnerable than community-based and government marine reserves. Social sensitivity was indicated by the occupational composition of each community, including the importance of fishing relative to other occupations, as well as the susceptibility of different fishing gears to the effects of coral bleaching on target fish species. Key components of social adaptive capacity varied considerably between the communities. Together, these results show that different communities have relative strengths and weaknesses in terms of social-ecological vulnerability to climate change.

KW - ADAPTIVE CAPACITY

KW - RESILIENCE

KW - IMPACTS

KW - ADAPTATION

KW - SYSTEMS

KW - COMANAGEMENT

KW - COMMUNITIES

KW - PERSPECTIVE

KW - ECOSYSTEMS

KW - MANAGEMENT

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0074321

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0074321

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

JO - PLoS ONE

JF - PLoS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 9

M1 - 74321

ER -