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Evaluation of the London–wide Race Hate Crime Forum as a model of good practice between statutory Criminal Justice Agencies and Voluntary Sector Non-Governmental Organisations

Research output: Book/Report/ProceedingsCommissioned report

Published

Publication date2007
Place of publicationLondon
PublisherLondon Probation Service
Number of pages32
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The London-Wide Race Hate Crime Forum was established in 2003 to promote co-ordination and co-operation between the key agencies responsible for dealing with race hate crime within each of the thirty-two London boroughs and also between agencies across the capital. This paper reports the findings from a qualitative case study carried out in May, June and July 2006 to evaluate the Forum as a model of good practice for multi-agency working against race hate crime that might be transferable to other cities and regions in Europe. The project was commissioned by the Reducing Hate Crime in Europe project, and supported by London Probation Service and by the London-Wide Race Hate Crime Forum. The research findings are set in the context of a review of the policy literature which indicates that the importance of co-operation between the police and other statutory agencies in tackling race hate crime, and between the statutory agencies and NGOs, has long been recognised in European countries and in EU policy recommendations. However, it is also observed that multi-agency working at city-wide level which provides the rationale for the London-Wide Race Hate Crime Forum has been neglected by the policy literature. The research for this paper shows that the Forum has initiated and manages a process of review, accountability and action that has stimulated policy activity within the London boroughs, and by those agencies that operate at the pan-London level as well as at the local level. This paper proposes the Forum as a potential model for multi-agency working in other cities and regions in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in Europe where agencies dealing with race hate crime at the local level also have responsibilities at city-wide or regional level.