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  • ricketts davies masterson stuart duff 2016-final-accepted Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 150, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013

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Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English. / Ricketts, Jessie; Davies, Robert Aye Imanol; Masterson, Jackie; Stuart, Morag; Duff, Fiona J.

In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 150, 10.2016, p. 330-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Ricketts, J, Davies, RAI, Masterson, J, Stuart, M & Duff, FJ 2016, 'Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English', Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 150, pp. 330-345. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013

APA

Ricketts, J., Davies, R. A. I., Masterson, J., Stuart, M., & Duff, F. J. (2016). Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 150, 330-345. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013

Vancouver

Ricketts J, Davies RAI, Masterson J, Stuart M, Duff FJ. Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 2016 Oct;150:330-345. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013

Author

Ricketts, Jessie ; Davies, Robert Aye Imanol ; Masterson, Jackie ; Stuart, Morag ; Duff, Fiona J. / Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English. In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 150. pp. 330-345.

Bibtex

@article{bb4769c0109a4484a37322058ab1bc1e,
title = "Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English",
abstract = "We investigated the relationship between semantic knowledge and word reading. A sample of 27 6-year-old children read words both in isolation and in context. Lexical knowledge was assessed using general and item-specific tasks. General semantic knowledge was measured using standardized tasks in which children defined words and made judgments about the relationships between words. Item-specific knowledge of to-be-read words was assessed using auditory lexical decision (lexical phonology) and definitions (semantic) tasks. Regressions and mixed-effects models indicated a close relationship between semantic knowledge (but not lexical phonology) and both regular and exception word reading. Thus, during the early stages of learning to read, semantic knowledge may support word reading irrespective of regularity. Contextual support particularly benefitted reading of exception words. We found evidence that lexical–semantic knowledge and context make separable contributions to word reading.",
keywords = "Semantic, Word reading, Context, Vocabulary, Lexical phonology, Mixed-effects models",
author = "Jessie Ricketts and Davies, {Robert Aye Imanol} and Jackie Masterson and Morag Stuart and Duff, {Fiona J.}",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 150, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013",
year = "2016",
month = oct
doi = "10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013",
language = "English",
volume = "150",
pages = "330--345",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Child Psychology",
issn = "0022-0965",
publisher = "ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evidence for semantic involvement in regular and exception word reading in emergent readers of English

AU - Ricketts, Jessie

AU - Davies, Robert Aye Imanol

AU - Masterson, Jackie

AU - Stuart, Morag

AU - Duff, Fiona J.

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 150, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013

PY - 2016/10

Y1 - 2016/10

N2 - We investigated the relationship between semantic knowledge and word reading. A sample of 27 6-year-old children read words both in isolation and in context. Lexical knowledge was assessed using general and item-specific tasks. General semantic knowledge was measured using standardized tasks in which children defined words and made judgments about the relationships between words. Item-specific knowledge of to-be-read words was assessed using auditory lexical decision (lexical phonology) and definitions (semantic) tasks. Regressions and mixed-effects models indicated a close relationship between semantic knowledge (but not lexical phonology) and both regular and exception word reading. Thus, during the early stages of learning to read, semantic knowledge may support word reading irrespective of regularity. Contextual support particularly benefitted reading of exception words. We found evidence that lexical–semantic knowledge and context make separable contributions to word reading.

AB - We investigated the relationship between semantic knowledge and word reading. A sample of 27 6-year-old children read words both in isolation and in context. Lexical knowledge was assessed using general and item-specific tasks. General semantic knowledge was measured using standardized tasks in which children defined words and made judgments about the relationships between words. Item-specific knowledge of to-be-read words was assessed using auditory lexical decision (lexical phonology) and definitions (semantic) tasks. Regressions and mixed-effects models indicated a close relationship between semantic knowledge (but not lexical phonology) and both regular and exception word reading. Thus, during the early stages of learning to read, semantic knowledge may support word reading irrespective of regularity. Contextual support particularly benefitted reading of exception words. We found evidence that lexical–semantic knowledge and context make separable contributions to word reading.

KW - Semantic

KW - Word reading

KW - Context

KW - Vocabulary

KW - Lexical phonology

KW - Mixed-effects models

U2 - 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013

DO - 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.013

M3 - Journal article

VL - 150

SP - 330

EP - 345

JO - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

SN - 0022-0965

ER -