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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Aging & Mental Health on 02/11/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13607863.2016.1247414

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Experiences of caring for a family member with Parkinson’s disease: a meta-synthesis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Aging and Mental Health
Issue number10
Volume21
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)1007-1016
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date2/11/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this qualitative meta-synthesis was to search and then synthesise family caregivers’ experiences of providing care to individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD).

Method: A systematic search resulted in the identification of 11 qualitative studies. Noblit and Hare's seven-stage approach was used to provide a higher-order interpretation of how family caregivers’ experienced the effects of taking on a caregiving role.

Results: The process of reciprocal translation resulted in four overarching themes: (1) the need to carry on as usual – ‘the caregiver must continue with his life’; (2) the importance of support in facilitating coping – ‘I'm still going back to the support group’; (3) the difficult balancing act between caregiving and caregiver needs – ‘I cannot get sick because I'm a caregiver’; (4) conflicts in seeking information and knowledge – ‘maybe better not to know’.

Conclusion: The themes reflected different aspects of family caregivers’ lives that were affected as a result of caring for a relative diagnosed with PD and these raise challenges for more simplistic theories of family caring and appropriate support structures. The findings also highlight several recommendations for clinical practice.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Aging & Mental Health on 02/11/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13607863.2016.1247414