Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Experiences of spouses of people with dementia ...
View graph of relations

Experiences of spouses of people with dementia in long-term care

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Experiences of spouses of people with dementia in long-term care. / Mullin, Jennifer; Simpson, Jane; Froggatt, Katherine.

In: Dementia, Vol. 12, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 177-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{ec3eb69e2d434120a2093e277ac7043d,
title = "Experiences of spouses of people with dementia in long-term care",
abstract = "The experiences of 10 spouses of people with dementia in long-term care were explored using semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) which resulted in four themes: {\textquoteleft}Identity: till death us do part{\textquoteright}; {\textquoteleft}Making sense of change{\textquoteright}; {\textquoteleft}Relationship with care provided: visiting as surveillance{\textquoteright}; and {\textquoteleft}Relationship with the future: hope versus despair{\textquoteright}. The findings highlighted the presence of conflicting feelings for the spouses, with positive feelings being voiced against a context of despair. Their perceptions of the care provided and the spousal relationship also highlighted the value of their views in supporting this group of people, improving dementia care and, hence, the importance of their involvement in implementing a {\textquoteleft}relationship-centred{\textquoteright} care approach.",
keywords = "dementia, interpretative phenomenological analysis, long-term care, spouses",
author = "Jennifer Mullin and Jane Simpson and Katherine Froggatt",
year = "2013",
month = mar
doi = "10.1177/1471301211418096",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "177--191",
journal = "Dementia",
issn = "1471-3012",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experiences of spouses of people with dementia in long-term care

AU - Mullin, Jennifer

AU - Simpson, Jane

AU - Froggatt, Katherine

PY - 2013/3

Y1 - 2013/3

N2 - The experiences of 10 spouses of people with dementia in long-term care were explored using semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) which resulted in four themes: ‘Identity: till death us do part’; ‘Making sense of change’; ‘Relationship with care provided: visiting as surveillance’; and ‘Relationship with the future: hope versus despair’. The findings highlighted the presence of conflicting feelings for the spouses, with positive feelings being voiced against a context of despair. Their perceptions of the care provided and the spousal relationship also highlighted the value of their views in supporting this group of people, improving dementia care and, hence, the importance of their involvement in implementing a ‘relationship-centred’ care approach.

AB - The experiences of 10 spouses of people with dementia in long-term care were explored using semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) which resulted in four themes: ‘Identity: till death us do part’; ‘Making sense of change’; ‘Relationship with care provided: visiting as surveillance’; and ‘Relationship with the future: hope versus despair’. The findings highlighted the presence of conflicting feelings for the spouses, with positive feelings being voiced against a context of despair. Their perceptions of the care provided and the spousal relationship also highlighted the value of their views in supporting this group of people, improving dementia care and, hence, the importance of their involvement in implementing a ‘relationship-centred’ care approach.

KW - dementia

KW - interpretative phenomenological analysis

KW - long-term care

KW - spouses

U2 - 10.1177/1471301211418096

DO - 10.1177/1471301211418096

M3 - Journal article

VL - 12

SP - 177

EP - 191

JO - Dementia

JF - Dementia

SN - 1471-3012

IS - 2

ER -