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  • Dargan et al 2016 mental imagery and self injury babcp final submitted pre-print version

    Rights statement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-and-cognitive-psychotherapy The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 44 (1), pp 92-103 2016, © 2016 Cambridge University Press.

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Exploring the role of mental imagery in the experience of self-injury: an interpretative phenomenological analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>01/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Issue number1
Volume44
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)92-103
Publication statusPublished
Early online date19/01/15
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Background: Research has implicated causal, mediating and meaningful roles for mental imagery in the experience of psychological distress, including self-injury. Aims: The present study aimed to further the understanding of this relationship through exploring the lived experiences of mental imagery from the perspective of those who self-injure. Method: This study employed an inductive qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Ten participants were recruited from universities in North West England. Results: Three main themes were identified from the analysis: (i) The origins and precipitants of self-injurious imagery; (ii) What it is like toexperience self-injurious imagery; and (iii) The meaning and interpretation of self-injurious imagery. Conclusions: The study findings indicate that mental imagery is an important experience for those who self-injure. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed.

Bibliographic note

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-and-cognitive-psychotherapy The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 44 (1), pp 92-103 2016, © 2016 Cambridge University Press.