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  • Discrimination_Health_REVISED_

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Public Health. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Public Health, 185, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2020.04.038

    Accepted author manuscript, 274 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 5/07/21

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Exposure to discrimination and subsequent changes in self-rated health: prospective evidence from the UK's Life Opportunities Survey

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
  • E. Emerson
  • A. Milner
  • Z. Aitken
  • C. Vaughan
  • G. Llewellyn
  • Anne M. Kavanagh
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/08/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Public Health
Volume185
Number of pages6
Pages (from-to)176-181
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date5/07/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Objectives: We sought to estimate risk of poor self-rated health (SRH) following exposure to disability-related and other forms of overt discrimination in a cohort of working age adults. Study design: The study design is a population-based cohort survey. Methods: Secondary analysis of data collected in Waves 1 and 2 of the UK's Life Opportunities Survey which at Wave 2 involved the participation of 12,789 working age adults. Adjusted prevalence rate ratios were used to estimate the impact of exposure to disability and non-disability discrimination on two measures of SRH at Wave 2, controlling for SRH status at Wave 1. Results: Exposure to disability discrimination in the previous year was reported by 3.9% of working age British adults. Other forms of discrimination were reported less frequently (age: 3.7%, ethnicity: 2.5%, gender: 1.6%, religion: 0.8%, sexual orientation: 0.4%). In all analyses, there were stronger associations between exposure to disability discrimination and poor SRH at Wave 2 when compared with exposure to other forms of discrimination. Conclusions: Disability discrimination represents a violation of human rights. It is also likely to be a major contributor to the health inequities experienced by working age adults with disability.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Public Health. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Public Health, 185, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2020.04.038