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  • Campopiano et al_2019_JCP_Accepted Manuscript

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Cleaner Production. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Cleaner Production, 214, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.12.319

    Accepted author manuscript, 398 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 31/12/19

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Family and non-family women on the board of directors: Effects on corporate citizenship behavior in family-controlled fashion firms

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>20/03/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume214
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)41-51
Publication statusPublished
Early online date31/12/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Drawing on self-construal theory and the family business literature, we offer theory and evidence on how the presence of women, either family members or not, on the board of directors of family firms affects firm engagement in corporate citizenship behavior. In examining corporate citizenship behavior, we argue that it is important to distinguish between corporate social responsibility and philanthropy as well as between family and non-family women on the board of directors. Using data from the population of 63 family-controlled firms in the global ranking of the top-100 fashion firms, we find support for our hypotheses: female directors are beneficial for corporate social responsibility engagement only if they are not members of the controlling family, while they are beneficial for philanthropic engagement only if they are members of the controlling family.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Cleaner Production. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Cleaner Production, 214, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.12.319