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Figurative language, genre and register

Research output: Book/Report/ProceedingsBook

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Figurative language, genre and register. / Deignan, Alice; Littlemore, Jeannette; Semino, Elena.

Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013. 330 p. (Cambridge Applied Linguistics).

Research output: Book/Report/ProceedingsBook

Harvard

Deignan, A, Littlemore, J & Semino, E 2013, Figurative language, genre and register. Cambridge Applied Linguistics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

APA

Deignan, A., Littlemore, J., & Semino, E. (2013). Figurative language, genre and register. (Cambridge Applied Linguistics). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Vancouver

Deignan A, Littlemore J, Semino E. Figurative language, genre and register. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 330 p. (Cambridge Applied Linguistics).

Author

Deignan, Alice ; Littlemore, Jeannette ; Semino, Elena. / Figurative language, genre and register. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013. 330 p. (Cambridge Applied Linguistics).

Bibtex

@book{05147deb621f4d9884ac2d70fcadf768,
title = "Figurative language, genre and register",
abstract = "This book brings together discourse analysis and corpus linguistics in a cutting-edge study of figurative language in spoken and written discourse. The authors explore a diverse range of communities from chronic pain sufferers to nursery staff to present a detailed framework for the analysis of figurative language. The reader is shown how figurative language is used between members of these communities to construct their own 'world view', and how this can change with a shift in perspective - for example, when nursery staff are talking to each other about children in their care, and when they are communicating with the children's parents. Figurative language is shown to be pervasive and inescapable, but it is also suggested that it varies significantly across genres. Hence, the use of figurative language can both help and hinder communication, especially when boundaries between genres and discourse communities are crossed.",
author = "Alice Deignan and Jeannette Littlemore and Elena Semino",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781107009431",
series = "Cambridge Applied Linguistics",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

RIS

TY - BOOK

T1 - Figurative language, genre and register

AU - Deignan, Alice

AU - Littlemore, Jeannette

AU - Semino, Elena

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This book brings together discourse analysis and corpus linguistics in a cutting-edge study of figurative language in spoken and written discourse. The authors explore a diverse range of communities from chronic pain sufferers to nursery staff to present a detailed framework for the analysis of figurative language. The reader is shown how figurative language is used between members of these communities to construct their own 'world view', and how this can change with a shift in perspective - for example, when nursery staff are talking to each other about children in their care, and when they are communicating with the children's parents. Figurative language is shown to be pervasive and inescapable, but it is also suggested that it varies significantly across genres. Hence, the use of figurative language can both help and hinder communication, especially when boundaries between genres and discourse communities are crossed.

AB - This book brings together discourse analysis and corpus linguistics in a cutting-edge study of figurative language in spoken and written discourse. The authors explore a diverse range of communities from chronic pain sufferers to nursery staff to present a detailed framework for the analysis of figurative language. The reader is shown how figurative language is used between members of these communities to construct their own 'world view', and how this can change with a shift in perspective - for example, when nursery staff are talking to each other about children in their care, and when they are communicating with the children's parents. Figurative language is shown to be pervasive and inescapable, but it is also suggested that it varies significantly across genres. Hence, the use of figurative language can both help and hinder communication, especially when boundaries between genres and discourse communities are crossed.

M3 - Book

SN - 9781107009431

T3 - Cambridge Applied Linguistics

BT - Figurative language, genre and register

PB - Cambridge University Press

CY - Cambridge

ER -