Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Friends interventions in psychosis
View graph of relations

Friends interventions in psychosis: a narrative review and call to action

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Friends interventions in psychosis : a narrative review and call to action. / Harrop, Chris; Ellett, Lyn; Brand, Rachel; Lobban, Fiona.

In: Early Intervention in Psychiatry, Vol. 9, No. 4, 08.2015, p. 269-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Harrop, C, Ellett, L, Brand, R & Lobban, F 2015, 'Friends interventions in psychosis: a narrative review and call to action', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 269-278. https://doi.org/10.1111/eip.12172

APA

Harrop, C., Ellett, L., Brand, R., & Lobban, F. (2015). Friends interventions in psychosis: a narrative review and call to action. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 9(4), 269-278. https://doi.org/10.1111/eip.12172

Vancouver

Harrop C, Ellett L, Brand R, Lobban F. Friends interventions in psychosis: a narrative review and call to action. Early Intervention in Psychiatry. 2015 Aug;9(4):269-278. https://doi.org/10.1111/eip.12172

Author

Harrop, Chris ; Ellett, Lyn ; Brand, Rachel ; Lobban, Fiona. / Friends interventions in psychosis : a narrative review and call to action. In: Early Intervention in Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 269-278.

Bibtex

@article{27bf9672f7b94c4b868916a693a0466e,
title = "Friends interventions in psychosis: a narrative review and call to action",
abstract = "AbstractAimsTo highlight the importance of friendships to young people with psychosis, and the need for clinical interventions to help maintain peer relationships during illness. To structure a research agenda for developing evidence-based interventions with friends.MethodAn argument is developed through a narrative review of (i) the proven efficacy of family interventions, and (by comparison) a relative absence of friend-based interventions; (ii) the particular primacy of friendships and dating for young people, and typical effects of exclusion; and (iii) reduced friendship networks and dating experiences in psychosis, in pre-, during and post-psychosis phases, also links between exclusion and psychosis.ResultsWe put forward a model of how poor friendships can potentially be a causal and/or maintenance factor for psychotic symptoms. Given this model, our thesis is that interventions aiming to maintain social networks can be hugely beneficial clinically for young people with psychosis. We give a case study to show how such an intervention can work.ConclusionsWe call for {\textquoteleft}friends interventions{\textquoteright} for young people with psychosis to be developed, where professionals directly work with a young person's authentic social group to support key friendships and maintain social continuity. An agenda for future research is presented that will develop and test theoretically driven interventions.",
keywords = "friends, intervention, model, peers, pschosis, social",
author = "Chris Harrop and Lyn Ellett and Rachel Brand and Fiona Lobban",
year = "2015",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1111/eip.12172",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "269--278",
journal = "Early Intervention in Psychiatry",
issn = "1751-7885",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Friends interventions in psychosis

T2 - a narrative review and call to action

AU - Harrop, Chris

AU - Ellett, Lyn

AU - Brand, Rachel

AU - Lobban, Fiona

PY - 2015/8

Y1 - 2015/8

N2 - AbstractAimsTo highlight the importance of friendships to young people with psychosis, and the need for clinical interventions to help maintain peer relationships during illness. To structure a research agenda for developing evidence-based interventions with friends.MethodAn argument is developed through a narrative review of (i) the proven efficacy of family interventions, and (by comparison) a relative absence of friend-based interventions; (ii) the particular primacy of friendships and dating for young people, and typical effects of exclusion; and (iii) reduced friendship networks and dating experiences in psychosis, in pre-, during and post-psychosis phases, also links between exclusion and psychosis.ResultsWe put forward a model of how poor friendships can potentially be a causal and/or maintenance factor for psychotic symptoms. Given this model, our thesis is that interventions aiming to maintain social networks can be hugely beneficial clinically for young people with psychosis. We give a case study to show how such an intervention can work.ConclusionsWe call for ‘friends interventions’ for young people with psychosis to be developed, where professionals directly work with a young person's authentic social group to support key friendships and maintain social continuity. An agenda for future research is presented that will develop and test theoretically driven interventions.

AB - AbstractAimsTo highlight the importance of friendships to young people with psychosis, and the need for clinical interventions to help maintain peer relationships during illness. To structure a research agenda for developing evidence-based interventions with friends.MethodAn argument is developed through a narrative review of (i) the proven efficacy of family interventions, and (by comparison) a relative absence of friend-based interventions; (ii) the particular primacy of friendships and dating for young people, and typical effects of exclusion; and (iii) reduced friendship networks and dating experiences in psychosis, in pre-, during and post-psychosis phases, also links between exclusion and psychosis.ResultsWe put forward a model of how poor friendships can potentially be a causal and/or maintenance factor for psychotic symptoms. Given this model, our thesis is that interventions aiming to maintain social networks can be hugely beneficial clinically for young people with psychosis. We give a case study to show how such an intervention can work.ConclusionsWe call for ‘friends interventions’ for young people with psychosis to be developed, where professionals directly work with a young person's authentic social group to support key friendships and maintain social continuity. An agenda for future research is presented that will develop and test theoretically driven interventions.

KW - friends

KW - intervention

KW - model

KW - peers

KW - pschosis

KW - social

U2 - 10.1111/eip.12172

DO - 10.1111/eip.12172

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - 269

EP - 278

JO - Early Intervention in Psychiatry

JF - Early Intervention in Psychiatry

SN - 1751-7885

IS - 4

ER -