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  • Dawson et al.,_2015_Accepted_Version

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Journal of Psychopharmacology, 29 (2), 2015, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Journal of Psychopharmacology page: http://jop.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

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Functional brain connectivity phenotypes for schizophrenia drug discovery

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Functional brain connectivity phenotypes for schizophrenia drug discovery. / Dawson, Neil; Morris, Brian J.; Pratt, Judith.

In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 29, No. 2, 02.2015, p. 169-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Dawson, N, Morris, BJ & Pratt, J 2015, 'Functional brain connectivity phenotypes for schizophrenia drug discovery', Journal of Psychopharmacology, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 169-177. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881114563635

APA

Dawson, N., Morris, B. J., & Pratt, J. (2015). Functional brain connectivity phenotypes for schizophrenia drug discovery. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 29(2), 169-177. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881114563635

Vancouver

Author

Dawson, Neil ; Morris, Brian J. ; Pratt, Judith. / Functional brain connectivity phenotypes for schizophrenia drug discovery. In: Journal of Psychopharmacology. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 169-177.

Bibtex

@article{383e0671b7134f5298896ebfb7378315,
title = "Functional brain connectivity phenotypes for schizophrenia drug discovery",
abstract = "While our knowledge of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia has increased dramatically, this has not translated into the development of new and improved drugs to treat this disorder. Human brain imaging and electrophysiological studies have provided dramatic new insight into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in the disease, with a swathe of recent studies highlighting the differences in functional brain network and neural system connectivity present in the disorder. Only recently has the value of applying these approaches in preclinical rodent models relevant to the disorder started to be recognised. Here we highlight recent findings of altered functional brain connectivity in preclinical rodent models and consider their relevance to those alterations seen in the brains of schizophrenia patients. Furthermore, we highlight the potential translational value of using the paradigm of functional brain connectivity phenotypes in the context of preclinical schizophrenia drug discovery, as a means both to understand the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in the disorder and to reduce the current high attrition rate in schizophrenia drug discovery.",
keywords = "EEG, fMRI, default node network, graph theory, genetic risk factors, NMDA receptor, hippocampal-prefrontal connectivity, thalamic connectivity",
author = "Neil Dawson and Morris, {Brian J.} and Judith Pratt",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 29(2): 169-177, 2015, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Journal of Psychopharmacology page: http://jop.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2015",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1177/0269881114563635",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "169--177",
journal = "Journal of Psychopharmacology",
issn = "0269-8811",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional brain connectivity phenotypes for schizophrenia drug discovery

AU - Dawson, Neil

AU - Morris, Brian J.

AU - Pratt, Judith

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 29(2): 169-177, 2015, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Journal of Psychopharmacology page: http://jop.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

PY - 2015/2

Y1 - 2015/2

N2 - While our knowledge of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia has increased dramatically, this has not translated into the development of new and improved drugs to treat this disorder. Human brain imaging and electrophysiological studies have provided dramatic new insight into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in the disease, with a swathe of recent studies highlighting the differences in functional brain network and neural system connectivity present in the disorder. Only recently has the value of applying these approaches in preclinical rodent models relevant to the disorder started to be recognised. Here we highlight recent findings of altered functional brain connectivity in preclinical rodent models and consider their relevance to those alterations seen in the brains of schizophrenia patients. Furthermore, we highlight the potential translational value of using the paradigm of functional brain connectivity phenotypes in the context of preclinical schizophrenia drug discovery, as a means both to understand the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in the disorder and to reduce the current high attrition rate in schizophrenia drug discovery.

AB - While our knowledge of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia has increased dramatically, this has not translated into the development of new and improved drugs to treat this disorder. Human brain imaging and electrophysiological studies have provided dramatic new insight into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in the disease, with a swathe of recent studies highlighting the differences in functional brain network and neural system connectivity present in the disorder. Only recently has the value of applying these approaches in preclinical rodent models relevant to the disorder started to be recognised. Here we highlight recent findings of altered functional brain connectivity in preclinical rodent models and consider their relevance to those alterations seen in the brains of schizophrenia patients. Furthermore, we highlight the potential translational value of using the paradigm of functional brain connectivity phenotypes in the context of preclinical schizophrenia drug discovery, as a means both to understand the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in the disorder and to reduce the current high attrition rate in schizophrenia drug discovery.

KW - EEG

KW - fMRI

KW - default node network

KW - graph theory

KW - genetic risk factors

KW - NMDA receptor

KW - hippocampal-prefrontal connectivity

KW - thalamic connectivity

U2 - 10.1177/0269881114563635

DO - 10.1177/0269881114563635

M3 - Journal article

VL - 29

SP - 169

EP - 177

JO - Journal of Psychopharmacology

JF - Journal of Psychopharmacology

SN - 0269-8811

IS - 2

ER -