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Genetic inherence of the response to human kairomones by two allopatric members of the Lutzomyia longipalpis complex

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/03/2006
<mark>Journal</mark>Physiological Entomology
Issue number1
Volume31
Number of pages4
Pages (from-to)94-97
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The sandfly Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva) is the main vector of Leishmania infantum in the New World. Several studies show that Lu. longipalpis is a species complex of at least three members. The feeding habits among the members of the complex vary from one geographical location to another. These differences in feeding habits may be related to differences between different members of the complex. The present study investigates differences in the response to human kairomones by two members of the complex, as well as the possibility that differences in the response have a genetic basis. One of the members used in this study is from Jacobina Bahia State, Brazil. Males from this population are known to produce a sex pheromone characterized by a C16 molecule identified as 3-methyl-α-himachelene. The other member is from a population originating in Marajó Island, Pará State, Brazil. Males from this location secrete a sex pheromone characterized by a C20 molecule whose structure remains to be elucidated, but is known to be a diterpene type. Our findings indicate that Jacobina females are significantly more responsive to human odours than Marajo females. When Jacobina and Marajó populations of Lu. longipalpis complex are cross-mated, the response of F1 females to the human odours is found to be genetically controlled.