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    Rights statement: ©2014. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Geomagnetic lunar and solar daily variations during the last 100 years

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Geomagnetic lunar and solar daily variations during the last 100 years. / Yamazaki , Yosuke; Kosch, Michael.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 119, No. 8, 08.2014, p. 6732-6744.

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Yamazaki , Yosuke ; Kosch, Michael. / Geomagnetic lunar and solar daily variations during the last 100 years. In: Journal of Geophysical Research. 2014 ; Vol. 119, No. 8. pp. 6732-6744.

Bibtex

@article{1991e59cac544418a4be90774b7a05e4,
title = "Geomagnetic lunar and solar daily variations during the last 100 years",
abstract = "This paper describes long-term changes in the geomagnetic lunar (L) and solar (S) daily variations. We analyze the eastward component of the geomagnetic field observed at eight midlatitude stations during 1903–2012. The amplitude and phase for the semidiurnal component of the L and S variations are examined. Both L and S amplitudes correlate with the solar activity index F10.7, revealing a prominent 11 year solar cycle. In both cases, the correlation is slightly better with inline image than F10.7. The sensitivity of the L variation to solar activity is comparable with that of the S variation. The solar cycle effect is also found in the phase of the S variation but not apparent in the phase of the L variation. The ratio in the amplitude of the L to S variation shows a long-term decrease (approximately 10% per century), which may be due to a reduction in lunar tidal waves from the lower atmosphere to the upper atmosphere in association with climate change.",
keywords = "geomagnetic daily variations, ionospheric currents, solar activity, upper atmosphere, long-term variations, climate change",
author = "Yosuke Yamazaki and Michael Kosch",
note = "{\textcopyright}2014. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.",
year = "2014",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1002/2014JA020203",
language = "English",
volume = "119",
pages = "6732--6744",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research",
issn = "0148-0227",
publisher = "American Geophysical Union",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geomagnetic lunar and solar daily variations during the last 100 years

AU - Yamazaki , Yosuke

AU - Kosch, Michael

N1 - ©2014. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - This paper describes long-term changes in the geomagnetic lunar (L) and solar (S) daily variations. We analyze the eastward component of the geomagnetic field observed at eight midlatitude stations during 1903–2012. The amplitude and phase for the semidiurnal component of the L and S variations are examined. Both L and S amplitudes correlate with the solar activity index F10.7, revealing a prominent 11 year solar cycle. In both cases, the correlation is slightly better with inline image than F10.7. The sensitivity of the L variation to solar activity is comparable with that of the S variation. The solar cycle effect is also found in the phase of the S variation but not apparent in the phase of the L variation. The ratio in the amplitude of the L to S variation shows a long-term decrease (approximately 10% per century), which may be due to a reduction in lunar tidal waves from the lower atmosphere to the upper atmosphere in association with climate change.

AB - This paper describes long-term changes in the geomagnetic lunar (L) and solar (S) daily variations. We analyze the eastward component of the geomagnetic field observed at eight midlatitude stations during 1903–2012. The amplitude and phase for the semidiurnal component of the L and S variations are examined. Both L and S amplitudes correlate with the solar activity index F10.7, revealing a prominent 11 year solar cycle. In both cases, the correlation is slightly better with inline image than F10.7. The sensitivity of the L variation to solar activity is comparable with that of the S variation. The solar cycle effect is also found in the phase of the S variation but not apparent in the phase of the L variation. The ratio in the amplitude of the L to S variation shows a long-term decrease (approximately 10% per century), which may be due to a reduction in lunar tidal waves from the lower atmosphere to the upper atmosphere in association with climate change.

KW - geomagnetic daily variations

KW - ionospheric currents

KW - solar activity

KW - upper atmosphere

KW - long-term variations

KW - climate change

U2 - 10.1002/2014JA020203

DO - 10.1002/2014JA020203

M3 - Journal article

VL - 119

SP - 6732

EP - 6744

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research

SN - 0148-0227

IS - 8

ER -