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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Advances in Water Resources. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Advances in Water Resources, 109, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.09.016

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Geophysical characterisation of the groundwater-surface water interface

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Geophysical characterisation of the groundwater-surface water interface. / McLachlan, P.J.; Chambers, J.E.; Uhlemann, S.S.; Binley, A.

In: Advances in Water Resources, Vol. 109, 11.2017, p. 302-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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McLachlan, P.J. ; Chambers, J.E. ; Uhlemann, S.S. ; Binley, A. / Geophysical characterisation of the groundwater-surface water interface. In: Advances in Water Resources. 2017 ; Vol. 109. pp. 302-319.

Bibtex

@article{174138323e95416c93e5482557c17b2f,
title = "Geophysical characterisation of the groundwater-surface water interface",
abstract = "Interactions between groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) have important implications for water quantity, water quality, and ecological health. The subsurface region proximal to SW bodies, the GW-SW interface, is crucial as it actively regulates the transfer of nutrients, contaminants, and water between GW systems and SW environments. However, geological, hydrological, and biogeochemical heterogeneity in the GW-SW interface makes it difficult to characterise with direct observations. Over the past two decades geophysics has been increasingly used to characterise spatial and temporal variability throughout the GW-SW interface. Geophysics is a powerful tool in evaluating structural heterogeneity, revealing zones of GW discharge, and monitoring hydrological processes. Geophysics should be used alongside traditional hydrological and biogeochemical methods to provide additional information about the subsurface. Further integration of commonly used geophysical techniques, and adoption of emerging techniques, has the potential to improve understanding of the properties and processes of the GW-SW interface, and ultimately the implications for water quality and environmental health.",
keywords = "Groundwater-surface water interactions, Groundwater-surface water interface, Hyporheic zone, Hydrogeophysics, Geophysics",
author = "P.J. McLachlan and J.E. Chambers and S.S. Uhlemann and A. Binley",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Advances in Water Resources. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Advances in Water Resources, 109, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.09.016",
year = "2017",
month = nov
doi = "10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.09.016",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
pages = "302--319",
journal = "Advances in Water Resources",
issn = "0309-1708",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geophysical characterisation of the groundwater-surface water interface

AU - McLachlan, P.J.

AU - Chambers, J.E.

AU - Uhlemann, S.S.

AU - Binley, A.

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Advances in Water Resources. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Advances in Water Resources, 109, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.09.016

PY - 2017/11

Y1 - 2017/11

N2 - Interactions between groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) have important implications for water quantity, water quality, and ecological health. The subsurface region proximal to SW bodies, the GW-SW interface, is crucial as it actively regulates the transfer of nutrients, contaminants, and water between GW systems and SW environments. However, geological, hydrological, and biogeochemical heterogeneity in the GW-SW interface makes it difficult to characterise with direct observations. Over the past two decades geophysics has been increasingly used to characterise spatial and temporal variability throughout the GW-SW interface. Geophysics is a powerful tool in evaluating structural heterogeneity, revealing zones of GW discharge, and monitoring hydrological processes. Geophysics should be used alongside traditional hydrological and biogeochemical methods to provide additional information about the subsurface. Further integration of commonly used geophysical techniques, and adoption of emerging techniques, has the potential to improve understanding of the properties and processes of the GW-SW interface, and ultimately the implications for water quality and environmental health.

AB - Interactions between groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) have important implications for water quantity, water quality, and ecological health. The subsurface region proximal to SW bodies, the GW-SW interface, is crucial as it actively regulates the transfer of nutrients, contaminants, and water between GW systems and SW environments. However, geological, hydrological, and biogeochemical heterogeneity in the GW-SW interface makes it difficult to characterise with direct observations. Over the past two decades geophysics has been increasingly used to characterise spatial and temporal variability throughout the GW-SW interface. Geophysics is a powerful tool in evaluating structural heterogeneity, revealing zones of GW discharge, and monitoring hydrological processes. Geophysics should be used alongside traditional hydrological and biogeochemical methods to provide additional information about the subsurface. Further integration of commonly used geophysical techniques, and adoption of emerging techniques, has the potential to improve understanding of the properties and processes of the GW-SW interface, and ultimately the implications for water quality and environmental health.

KW - Groundwater-surface water interactions

KW - Groundwater-surface water interface

KW - Hyporheic zone

KW - Hydrogeophysics

KW - Geophysics

U2 - 10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.09.016

DO - 10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.09.016

M3 - Journal article

VL - 109

SP - 302

EP - 319

JO - Advances in Water Resources

JF - Advances in Water Resources

SN - 0309-1708

ER -