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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journalism Practice on 11/06/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512786.2020.1776142

    Accepted author manuscript, 852 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 11/12/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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“Going offline”: Social media, source verification, and Chinese investigative journalism during “information overload"

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>11/06/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Journalism Practice
Number of pages17
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date11/06/20
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Based on interviews with 25 investigative journalists in Beijing, China, this study suggests digital journalists may be increasingly challenged by a sense of “information overload” as they navigate social media and online environments crowded with dis- and mis-information, fake profiles and sources, and massive amounts of opinion journalism that is presented as professional journalism. This overload has reinforced Chinese investigative journalists’ dedication to a conventional form of verification: meeting face-to-face with sources. This study contributes to scholarship on Chinese journalism by expanding knowledge about investigative journalists in the country and by complicating understandings of how journalists there work in an age of social media, disinformation, and increased interests in verification.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journalism Practice on 11/06/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512786.2020.1776142