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  • Mertens_ACSNano_10.1021:acsnano.9b00439_accepted version

    Rights statement: This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Nano, copyright ©2019 American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsnano.9b00439

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Graphite and Graphene Fairy Circles: A Bottom-Up Approach for the Formation of Nanocorrals

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
  • T.H. Phan
  • H. Van Gorp
  • Z. Li
  • T.M. Trung Huynh
  • Y. Fujita
  • L. Verstraete
  • S. Eyley
  • W. Thielemans
  • H. Uji-I
  • B.E. Hirsch
  • S.F.L. Mertens
  • J. Greenwood
  • O. Ivasenko
  • S. De Feyter
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>23/04/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>ACS Nano
Issue number5
Volume13
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)5559-5571
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

A convenient covalent functionalization approach and nanopatterning method of graphite and graphene is developed. In contrast to expectations, electrochemically activated dediazotization of a mixture of two aryl diazonium compounds in aqueous media leads to a spatially inhomogeneous functionalization of graphitic surfaces, creating covalently modified surfaces with quasi-uniform spaced islands of pristine graphite or graphene, coined nanocorrals. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry approaches are compared. The average diameter (45-130 nm) and surface density (20-125 corrals/μm 2 ) of these nanocorrals are tunable. These chemically modified nanostructured graphitic (CMNG) surfaces are characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Mechanisms leading to the formation of these CMNG surfaces are discussed. The potential of these surfaces to investigate supramolecular self-assembly and on-surface reactions under nanoconfinement conditions is demonstrated. © 2019 American Chemical Society.

Bibliographic note

This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Nano, copyright ©2019 American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsnano.9b00439