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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 192, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.07.040

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Growing practices and the use of potentially harmful chemical additives among a sample of small-scale cannabis growers in three countries

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/11/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume192
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)250-256
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date13/09/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Background: With the growth of legal cannabis markets there has been recognition of the adverse impacts of certain cannabis growing practices, notably, use of harmful chemicals. A major concern has been use of Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs) which limit plant size and stimulate bud production. These chemicals, many of which have been banned from food crops, have been found unlisted in cannabis growing nutrients sold online or in hydroponic stores. This study describes the cannabis growing practices used by small-scale recreational cannabis growers and specifically their self-reported use of chemicals.
Methods: Web survey data from 1,722 current and recent cannabis growers in Australia, Denmark and the UK, who were asked about their cannabis growing practices, including the use of fertilizers and supplements.
Results: Overall 44% of the sample reported using any chemical fertilizers, supplements or insecticides. Logistic regression indicated that the only unique predictor of the use of chemicals was growing hydroponically.
Conclusion: Problems associated with product labelling and uncertainty regarding product constituents made it difficult for growers and the researchers to determine which products likely contained PGRs or other harmful chemicals. There is a need for further research to analyze constituents of chemical products marketed to cannabis growers.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 192, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.07.040