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Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Handling Policy Conflicts in Call Control
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Handling Policy Conflicts in Call Control

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsPaper

Published

Publication date2005
Host publicationFeature Interactions in Telecommunications and Software Systems VIII
EditorsStephan Reiff-Marganiec , Mark D. Ryan
Place of publicationAmsterdam
PublisherIOS Press
Pages39-57
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9781586035242
Original languageEnglish

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Feature Interactions in Telecommunications and Software Systems
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period28/06/05 → …

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Feature Interactions in Telecommunications and Software Systems
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period28/06/05 → …

Abstract

Policies are becoming increasingly important in modern computer systems as a mechanism for end users and organisations to exhibit a level of control over software. Policies have long been established as an effective mechanism for enabling appropriate access control over resources, and for enforcing security considerations. However they are now becoming valued as a more general management mechanism for large-scale heterogeneous systems, including those exhibiting adaptive or autonomic behaviour.
In the telecommunications domain, features have been widely used to provide users with (limited) control over calls. However, features have the disadvantage that they are low-level and implementation-oriented in nature. Furthermore, apart from limited parameterisation of some features, they tend to be very inflexible. Policies, in contrast, have the potential to be much higher-level, goal-oriented, and very flexible.
This paper presents an architecture and its realisation for distributed and hierarchical policies within the telecommunications domain. The work deals with the important issue of policy conflict – the analogy of feature interaction.