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Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys’ and girls’ literacies

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Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys’ and girls’ literacies. / Dempster, Steven; Sunderland, Jane; Thistlethwaite, Joanne.

In: New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2015, p. 91-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Dempster, S, Sunderland, J & Thistlethwaite, J 2015, 'Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys’ and girls’ literacies', New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 91-112. https://doi.org/10.1080/13614541.2015.1078623

APA

Dempster, S., Sunderland, J., & Thistlethwaite, J. (2015). Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys’ and girls’ literacies. New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship, 21(2), 91-112. https://doi.org/10.1080/13614541.2015.1078623

Vancouver

Dempster S, Sunderland J, Thistlethwaite J. Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys’ and girls’ literacies. New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship. 2015;21(2):91-112. https://doi.org/10.1080/13614541.2015.1078623

Author

Dempster, Steven ; Sunderland, Jane ; Thistlethwaite, Joanne. / Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys’ and girls’ literacies. In: New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 91-112.

Bibtex

@article{62f3d9f5159b469fa9650930fbf4e813,
title = "Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys{\textquoteright} and girls{\textquoteright} literacies",
abstract = "While children{\textquoteright}s literacy is of concern, Harry Potter is sometimes identified as a ray of light. This paper explores the {\textquoteleft}Harry Potter effect{\textquoteright} empirically. Questionnaire responses from 621 primary and secondary school pupils point to certain relationships between the Potter books and boys' and girls{\textquoteright} reported literacy practices and achievements. Most readers claimed that Harry Potter had helped their reading, but gender-differential tendencies were not significant, and claims regarding any revolutionary impact of Potter on boys{\textquoteright} reading would seem misplaced. A few significant gender tendencies were found, for example numbers of readers (more boys), and re-reading the novels (associated with girls).",
author = "Steven Dempster and Jane Sunderland and Joanne Thistlethwaite",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/13614541.2015.1078623",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "91--112",
journal = "New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship",
issn = "1361-4541",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Harry Potter and the transfiguration of boys’ and girls’ literacies

AU - Dempster, Steven

AU - Sunderland, Jane

AU - Thistlethwaite, Joanne

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - While children’s literacy is of concern, Harry Potter is sometimes identified as a ray of light. This paper explores the ‘Harry Potter effect’ empirically. Questionnaire responses from 621 primary and secondary school pupils point to certain relationships between the Potter books and boys' and girls’ reported literacy practices and achievements. Most readers claimed that Harry Potter had helped their reading, but gender-differential tendencies were not significant, and claims regarding any revolutionary impact of Potter on boys’ reading would seem misplaced. A few significant gender tendencies were found, for example numbers of readers (more boys), and re-reading the novels (associated with girls).

AB - While children’s literacy is of concern, Harry Potter is sometimes identified as a ray of light. This paper explores the ‘Harry Potter effect’ empirically. Questionnaire responses from 621 primary and secondary school pupils point to certain relationships between the Potter books and boys' and girls’ reported literacy practices and achievements. Most readers claimed that Harry Potter had helped their reading, but gender-differential tendencies were not significant, and claims regarding any revolutionary impact of Potter on boys’ reading would seem misplaced. A few significant gender tendencies were found, for example numbers of readers (more boys), and re-reading the novels (associated with girls).

U2 - 10.1080/13614541.2015.1078623

DO - 10.1080/13614541.2015.1078623

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 91

EP - 112

JO - New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship

JF - New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship

SN - 1361-4541

IS - 2

ER -