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HCI and Affective Health: Taking stock of a decade of studies and charting future research directions

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Publication date4/05/2019
Host publication2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherACM
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9781450359702
Original languageEnglish
Event2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 4/05/20199/05/2019
https://chi2019.acm.org/

Conference

Conference2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleCHI '19
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period4/05/199/05/19
Internet address

Conference

Conference2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleCHI '19
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period4/05/199/05/19
Internet address

Abstract

In the last decade, the number of articles on HCI and health has increased dramatically. We extracted 139 papers on depression, anxiety and bipolar health issues from 10 years of SIGCHI conference proceedings. 72 of these were published in the last two years. A systematic analysis of this growing body of literature revealed that most innovation happens in automated diagnosis, and self-tracking, although there are innovative ideas in tangible interfaces. We noted an overemphasis on data production without consideration of how it leads to fruitful interventions. Moreover, we see a need to promote ethical practices for involvement of people living with affective disorders. Finally, although only 16 studies evaluate technologies in a clinical context, several forms of support and intervention illustrate how rich insights are gained from evaluations with real patients. Our findings highlight potential for growth in the design space of affective health technologies.