Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Hemispheric processing of memory is affected by...

Associated organisational unit

Electronic data

  • monaghan_shaw_ashworth_newbury_16_bandl

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Brain and Language. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Brain and Language, 167, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2016.05.003

    Accepted author manuscript, 28.6 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Hemispheric processing of memory is affected by sleep

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>04/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Brain and Language
Volume167
Number of pages8
Pages (from-to)36-43
Publication statusPublished
Early online date22/05/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Sleep is known to affect learning and memory, but the extent to which it influences behavioural processing in the left and right hemispheres of the brain is as yet unknown. We tested two hypotheses about lateralised effects of sleep on recognition memory for words: whether sleep reactivated recent experiences of words promoting access to the long-term store in the left hemisphere (LH), and whether sleep enhanced spreading activation differentially in semantic networks in the hemispheres. In Experiment 1, participants viewed lists of semantically related words, then slept or stayed awake for 12 h before being tested on seen, unseen but related, or unrelated words presented to the left or the right hemisphere. Sleep was found to promote word recognition in the LH, and to spread activation equally within semantic networks in both hemispheres. Experiment 2 ensured that the results were not due to time of day effects influencing cognitive performance.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Brain and Language. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Brain and Language, 167, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2016.05.003