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  • Baneth et al final version

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in European Journal of Protistology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in European Journal of Protistology, 76, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejop.2020.125741

    Accepted author manuscript, 230 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 18/09/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND

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Host-parasite interactions in vector-borne protozoan infections

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Article number125741
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/10/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>European Journal of Protistology
Volume76
Number of pages6
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date18/09/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Protists embrace many species, some of which may be either occasional or permanent parasites of vertebrate animals. Between the parasite species, several of medical and veterinary importance are vector-transmitted. The ecology and epidemiology of vector-borne parasitoses, including babesiosis, leishmaniasis and malaria, are particularly complex, as they are influenced by many factors, such as vector reproductive efficiency and geographical spread, vectorial capacity, host immunity, travel and human behaviour and climatic factors. Transmission dynamics are determined by the interactions between pathogen, vector, host and environmental factors and, given their complexity, many different types of mathematical models have been developed to understand them. A good basic knowledge of vector-pathogen relationships and transmission dynamics is thus essential for disease surveillance and control interventions and may help in understanding the spread of epidemics and be useful for public health planning.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in European Journal of Protistology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in European Journal of Protistology, 76, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejop.2020.125741