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  • Standards and energy demand online version

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Environment and Planning A, ? (?), 2017, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Environment and Planning A page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/EPN on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

  • Standards and energy demand pre-print

    Final published version, 222 KB, PDF-document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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How market standards affect building design: the case of low energy design in commercial offices

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>15/01/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Environment and Planning A
Number of pages24
<mark>State</mark>E-pub ahead of print
Early online date15/01/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This paper develops existing work on building design through a focus on one important yet understudied form of regulation: market standards. Market standards are agreed upon definitions of ‘necessary’ provision in buildings and are fundamental in ‘formatting’ markets and determining the value of a building in the market. The paper presents a case study of the design of ten commercial offices in London, UK, the effects of market standards on the designs and on the potential for the development of lower energy buildings. Theoretically, the paper integrates literatures on standards, institutions and markets to argue that market standards do important ‘work’ in design processes that requires closer scrutiny. In particular, we show that market standards: are an important form of normative and cultural regulation in the field of commercial office design; format and act as calculative devices in property markets; and result in forms of knowledge diminution that break the relationship between building design and occupiers’ practices. Together, these effects result in particular designs being legitimised and valued, and lower energy designs being delegitimised, devalued and pushed to the periphery of the attention of commercial office designers.

Bibliographic note

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Environment and Planning A, ? (?), 2018, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2018 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Environment and Planning A page:
http://journals.sagepub.com/home/EPN on SAGE Journals Online:
http://journals.sagepub.com/