Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > How service‐users with intellectual disabilitie...

Electronic data

  • Clarke Dagnan Smith 2019 preprint

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clarke, A, Dagnan, D, Smith, IC. How service‐users with intellectual disabilities understand challenging behaviour and approaches to managing it. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities. doi: 10.1111/jar.12612 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jar.12612 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

    Accepted author manuscript, 314 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 7/05/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

How service‐users with intellectual disabilities understand challenging behaviour and approaches to managing it

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/09/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Issue number5
Volume32
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)1203-1215
Publication statusPublished
Early online date7/05/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Background

This study explored understandings that service‐users with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour held around their behaviour, what shaped these understandings, and the relationship between how behaviours are managed and well‐being.
Methods

Eight participants (three female, five male) partook in individual semi‐structured qualitative interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.
Results

Three master themes emerged from this analysis: (a) challenging behaviour can be explained via an internal or external frame of reference, with each framework having different implications for how participants attempted to manage behaviour. (b) Positive relationships provide a long‐term buffer to challenging behaviour, with positive relationships with family, staff and peers operating through different mechanisms to achieve this. (c) A greater ability to exert power and control in day‐to‐day life was perceived to reduce challenging behaviour in the long term.
Conclusions

Implications for practice are discussed.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clarke, A, Dagnan, D, Smith, IC. How service‐users with intellectual disabilities understand challenging behaviour and approaches to managing it. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities. doi: 10.1111/jar.12612 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jar.12612 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.