Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Imaging cervical cytology with scanning near-fi...

Electronic data

  • SciRep2016

    Accepted author manuscript, 2.7 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

  • SciRep2016-SI Supplementary Information

    Accepted author manuscript, 4.01 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Imaging cervical cytology with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) coupled with an IR-FEL

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
Article number29494
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>12/07/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Scientific Reports
Volume6
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Cervical cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among women, especially in the developing world. Increased synthesis of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids is a pre-condition for the rapid proliferation of cancer cells. We show that scanning near-field optical microscopy, in combination with an infrared free electron laser (SNOM-IR-FEL), is able to distinguish between normal and squamous low-grade and high-grade dyskaryosis, and between normal and mixed squamous/glandular pre-invasive and adenocarcinoma cervical lesions, at designated wavelengths associated with DNA, Amide I/II and lipids. These findings evidence the promise of the SNOM-IR-FEL technique in obtaining chemical information relevant to the detection of cervical cell abnormalities and cancer diagnosis at spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit (≥0.2 μm). We compare these results with analyses following attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy; although this latter approach has been demonstrated to detect underlying cervical atypia missed by conventional cytology, it is limited by a spatial resolution of ~3 μm to 30 μm due to the optical diffraction limit.