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  • Loopstra_AuthorManuscript_SanctioningFoodbankUse

    Rights statement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-social-policy/article/impact-of-welfare-benefit-sanctioning-on-food-insecurity-a-dynamic-crossarea-study-of-food-bank-usage-in-the-uk/9BDC098A9A432583859D6739C0A0DA0C The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Journal of Social Policy, 47 (3), pp 437-457 2018, © 2018 Cambridge University Press.

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Impact of Welfare Benefit Sanctioning on Food Insecurity: A Dynamic Cross-Area Study of Food Bank Usage in the UK

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>07/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Social Policy
Issue number3
Volume47
Number of pages21
Pages (from-to)437-457
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date24/01/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Since 2009, the UK has witnessed marked increases in the rate of sanctions applied to unemployment insurance claimants, as part of a wider agenda of austerity and welfare reform. In 2013, over one million sanctions were applied, stopping benefit payments for a minimum of four weeks and potentially leaving people facing economic hardship and driving them to use food banks. Here we explore whether sanctioning is associated with food bank use by linking data from The Trussell Trust Foodbank Network with records on sanctioning rates across 259 local authorities in the UK. After accounting for local authority differences and time trends, the rate of adults fed by food banks rose by an additional 3.36 adults per 100,000 (95% CI: 1.71 to 5.01) as the rate of sanctioning increased by 10 per 100,000 adults. The availability of food distribution sites affected how tightly sanctioning and food bank usage were associated (p < 0.001); in areas with few distribution sites, rising sanctions led to smaller increases in food bank usage. In conclusion, sanctioning is closely linked with rising food bank usage, but the impact of sanctioning on household food insecurity is not fully reflected in available data.

Bibliographic note

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-social-policy/article/impact-of-welfare-benefit-sanctioning-on-food-insecurity-a-dynamic-crossarea-study-of-food-bank-usage-in-the-uk/9BDC098A9A432583859D6739C0A0DA0C The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Journal of Social Policy, 47 (3), pp 437-457 2018, © 2018 Cambridge University Press.