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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Teaching and Teacher Education. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Teaching and Teacher Education, 68, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.tate.2017.08.005

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Inclusive practices in teaching students with dyslexia: Second language teachers’ concerns, attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs on a massive open online learning course

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>11/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Teaching and Teacher Education
Volume68
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)30-41
Publication statusPublished
Early online date24/08/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Abstract In this study we investigated whether language teachers' self-confidence, self-efficacy and attitudes to using inclusive educational practices with dyslexic students differ before and after participation in a massive open online course (MOOC). An online questionnaire survey, before (n = 1187) and after the course (n = 752), showed that the participants’ post-course attitudes were more positive, their self-efficacy beliefs higher and their concerns lower than at the beginning of the course. Participants who completed more tasks on the course demonstrated increased post-course self-efficacy beliefs and those who posted more comments reported lower levels of worry about the implementation of inclusive language teaching practices.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Teaching and Teacher Education. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Teaching and Teacher Education, 68, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.tate.2017.08.005