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  • HeReflectometryPO

    Rights statement: Copyright 2016 American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics. The following article appeared in Low Temperature Physics, 42 (2), 2016 and may be found at http://http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/ltp/42/2/10.1063/1.4941005

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  • 1.4941005

    Rights statement: C 2016 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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Influence of the liquid helium meniscus on neutron reflectometry data

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>02/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Low Temperature Physics
Issue number2
Volume42
Number of pages5
Pages (from-to)202-206
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Neutron reflectometry offers a unique opportunity for the direct observation of nano-stratification in 3He-4He mixtures in the ultra-low temperature limit. Unfortunately the results of recent experiments could not be well-modelled on account of a seemingly anomalous variation of reflectivity with momentum transfer. We now hypothesize that this effect is attributable to an optical distortion caused by the liquid’s meniscus near the container wall. The validity of this idea is tested and confirmed through a subsidiary experiment on a D2O sample, showing that the meniscus can significantly distort results if the beam size in the horizontal plane is comparable with, or bigger than, the diameter of the container. The meniscus problem can be eliminated if the beam size is substantially smaller than the diameter of the container, such that reflection takes place only from the flat region of the liquid surface thus excluding the meniscus tails. Practical measures for minimising the meniscus distortion effect are discussed.

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C 2016 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)