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Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States

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Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States. / Lee, Neil; Rodriguez-Pose, Andres.

In: Journal of Economic Geography, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 1-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Lee, N & Rodriguez-Pose, A 2013, 'Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States', Journal of Economic Geography, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/jeg/lbs022

APA

Lee, N., & Rodriguez-Pose, A. (2013). Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States. Journal of Economic Geography, 13(1), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/jeg/lbs022

Vancouver

Lee N, Rodriguez-Pose A. Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States. Journal of Economic Geography. 2013 Jan;13(1):1-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/jeg/lbs022

Author

Lee, Neil ; Rodriguez-Pose, Andres. / Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States. In: Journal of Economic Geography. 2013 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 1-22.

Bibtex

@article{d055e6ebdd464cc4a21aa9baec731d9a,
title = "Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States",
abstract = "Innovation is a crucial driver of urban and regional economic success. Innovative cities and regions tend to grow faster and have higher average wages. Little research, however, has considered the potential negative consequences: as a small body of innovators gain relative to others, innovation may lead to inequality. The evidence on this point is fragmented, based on cross-sectional evidence on skill premia rather than overall levels of inequality. This article provides the first comparative evidence on the link between innovation and inequality in a continental perspective. Using micro data from population surveys for European regions and US cities, the article finds, after controlling for other potential factors, good evidence of a link between innovation and inequality in European regions, but only limited evidence of such a relationship in USA. Less-flexible labour markets and lower levels of migration seem to be at the root of the stronger association between innovation and income inequality in Europe than in USA.",
keywords = "Innovation, Inequality, European Union, USA, Cities, Regions",
author = "Neil Lee and Andres Rodriguez-Pose",
year = "2013",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1093/jeg/lbs022",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "1--22",
journal = "Journal of Economic Geography",
issn = "1468-2702",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Innovation and spatial inequality in Europe and United States

AU - Lee, Neil

AU - Rodriguez-Pose, Andres

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - Innovation is a crucial driver of urban and regional economic success. Innovative cities and regions tend to grow faster and have higher average wages. Little research, however, has considered the potential negative consequences: as a small body of innovators gain relative to others, innovation may lead to inequality. The evidence on this point is fragmented, based on cross-sectional evidence on skill premia rather than overall levels of inequality. This article provides the first comparative evidence on the link between innovation and inequality in a continental perspective. Using micro data from population surveys for European regions and US cities, the article finds, after controlling for other potential factors, good evidence of a link between innovation and inequality in European regions, but only limited evidence of such a relationship in USA. Less-flexible labour markets and lower levels of migration seem to be at the root of the stronger association between innovation and income inequality in Europe than in USA.

AB - Innovation is a crucial driver of urban and regional economic success. Innovative cities and regions tend to grow faster and have higher average wages. Little research, however, has considered the potential negative consequences: as a small body of innovators gain relative to others, innovation may lead to inequality. The evidence on this point is fragmented, based on cross-sectional evidence on skill premia rather than overall levels of inequality. This article provides the first comparative evidence on the link between innovation and inequality in a continental perspective. Using micro data from population surveys for European regions and US cities, the article finds, after controlling for other potential factors, good evidence of a link between innovation and inequality in European regions, but only limited evidence of such a relationship in USA. Less-flexible labour markets and lower levels of migration seem to be at the root of the stronger association between innovation and income inequality in Europe than in USA.

KW - Innovation

KW - Inequality

KW - European Union

KW - USA

KW - Cities

KW - Regions

U2 - 10.1093/jeg/lbs022

DO - 10.1093/jeg/lbs022

M3 - Journal article

VL - 13

SP - 1

EP - 22

JO - Journal of Economic Geography

JF - Journal of Economic Geography

SN - 1468-2702

IS - 1

ER -