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  • AiE_Special_Issue_BrunfautHarding_AuthorAcceptedManuscript

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice on 6/12/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0969594X.2019.1700213

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.27 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 6/06/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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International language proficiency standards in the local context: Interpreting the CEFR in standard setting for exam reform in Luxembourg

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>6/12/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice
Number of pages17
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date6/12/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

In the field of second and foreign language learning, the Common European Framework of Reference for languages (CEFR) is widely-used for setting language proficiency standards within European, and increasingly global, contexts. Few studies, however, have investigated the ways in which systemic, macro-level factors within national educational contexts may influence standard setting practices using the CEFR. In this paper, we explore this issue through an analysis of recorded discussions within standard setting sessions for the Épreuve Commune for English, a national English language examination in Luxembourg. The data reveals four key sources of influence on standard setting decision-making: Luxembourg’s unique language ecology, streamed schooling, the national curriculum, and an ongoing exam reform project. Through this analysis, we argue that Luxembourg functions as a critical case illustrating the tension between international standards of language proficiency and local realities.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice on 6/12/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0969594X.2019.1700213