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Interpreting green design: beyond performance and ideology

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Interpreting green design : beyond performance and ideology. / Farmer, Graham; Guy, Simon.

In: Built Environment, Vol. 28, No. 1, 2002, p. 11-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Farmer, G & Guy, S 2002, 'Interpreting green design: beyond performance and ideology', Built Environment, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 11-21.

APA

Farmer, G., & Guy, S. (2002). Interpreting green design: beyond performance and ideology. Built Environment, 28(1), 11-21.

Vancouver

Farmer G, Guy S. Interpreting green design: beyond performance and ideology. Built Environment. 2002;28(1):11-21.

Author

Farmer, Graham ; Guy, Simon. / Interpreting green design : beyond performance and ideology. In: Built Environment. 2002 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 11-21.

Bibtex

@article{af3299c08d8642039281d0a9ad9efc67,
title = "Interpreting green design: beyond performance and ideology",
abstract = "Three buildings in north-east England provide examples of very particular design responses to differing physical and development contexts, each incorporating a range of environmental innovations to achieve sustainability. It is argued that each building is shaped by a merging of distinctive philosophies of green design and by the widely differing motivations and competing social commitments of the actors involved. Thus we must view sustainable building not simply as a question of technical design but fundamentally as a social construct",
author = "Graham Farmer and Simon Guy",
year = "2002",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "11--21",
journal = "Built Environment",
issn = "0263-7960",
publisher = "Alexandrine Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interpreting green design

T2 - beyond performance and ideology

AU - Farmer, Graham

AU - Guy, Simon

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Three buildings in north-east England provide examples of very particular design responses to differing physical and development contexts, each incorporating a range of environmental innovations to achieve sustainability. It is argued that each building is shaped by a merging of distinctive philosophies of green design and by the widely differing motivations and competing social commitments of the actors involved. Thus we must view sustainable building not simply as a question of technical design but fundamentally as a social construct

AB - Three buildings in north-east England provide examples of very particular design responses to differing physical and development contexts, each incorporating a range of environmental innovations to achieve sustainability. It is argued that each building is shaped by a merging of distinctive philosophies of green design and by the widely differing motivations and competing social commitments of the actors involved. Thus we must view sustainable building not simply as a question of technical design but fundamentally as a social construct

M3 - Journal article

VL - 28

SP - 11

EP - 21

JO - Built Environment

JF - Built Environment

SN - 0263-7960

IS - 1

ER -