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  • CJIC_2015_0320.R3_near_final

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Interprofessional Care on 31/01/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13561820.2016.1253546

    Accepted author manuscript, 417 KB, PDF document

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Interprofessional spanning and maintaining boundaries when supporting potential embryo donors to stem cell research

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>04/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Interprofessional Care
Issue number3
Volume31
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)342-350
Publication statusPublished
Early online date31/01/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

When patients undergo fertility treatment, it is likely that a surplus of embryos will be created. The existence of these surplus embryos creates responsibilities for the clinics where they are stored and for the people who own them. Since 2001, the owners of the surplus embryos in the UK have the option to donate them to be used in stem cell research (SCR). This development has generated a new population - potential embryo donors to SCR – who have unique support needs as they are neither fertility patients nor donors. However, little is known how lay and professional stakeholders associated with fertility treatment and SCR have conceptualised the support needs of potential embryo donors to SCR or have responded to the additional task once the option became available. In this paper, we draw on Gieryn’s concept of boundary-work to explore how the emergence of donating embryos to SCR has provided opportunities for embryologists, counsellors and scientists to shift, adapt or confirm their roles, knowledge base and areas of expertise. We present a thematic analysis of 21 in-depth, semi-structured interviews conducted between September 2006 and January 2007 with UK lay and professional stakeholders associated with fertility treatment, and SCR. We conclude with reflections on the implications this boundary-work has for those contemplating donating embryos to SCR, and the care they receive when making their decision. Such insights are pertinent given the current policy and practice discussions led by the National Donation Strategy Group to improve the care of donors in the UK.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Interprofessional Care on 31/01/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13561820.2016.1253546