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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 68, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.rssm.2020.100528

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    Embargo ends: 10/07/21

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Intersecting ethnic and native–migrant inequalities in the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK

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Intersecting ethnic and native–migrant inequalities in the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. / Hu, Yang.

In: Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, Vol. 68, 100528, 01.08.2020.

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@article{cd4b5fe3d8814125a6b1e92240b05ad5,
title = "Intersecting ethnic and native–migrant inequalities in the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK",
abstract = "Analyzing new nationwide data from the Understanding Society COVID-19 survey (N = 10,336), this research examines intersecting ethnic and native–migrant inequalities in the impact of COVID-19 on people{\textquoteright}s economic well-being in the UK. The results show that compared with white non-migrants, black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK are more likely to experience job loss during the COVID-19 lockdown, while BAME natives are less likely to enjoy employment protection such as furloughing. Although white non-migrants are more likely to reduce their work hours during the COVID-19 pandemic than BAME migrants, they are less likely to experience income loss and face increased financial hardship during the pandemic than BAME migrants. The findings show that the pandemic exacerbates entrenched socio-economic inequalities along intersecting ethnic and native–migrant lines. They urge governments and policy makers to place racial justice at the center of policy developments in response to the pandemic.",
keywords = "COVID-19, Ethnicity, Economic impact, Inequality, Intersectionality, Migrant status, UK",
author = "Yang Hu",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 68, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.rssm.2020.100528",
year = "2020",
month = aug
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.rssm.2020.100528",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
journal = "Research in Social Stratification and Mobility",
issn = "0276-5624",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intersecting ethnic and native–migrant inequalities in the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK

AU - Hu, Yang

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 68, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.rssm.2020.100528

PY - 2020/8/1

Y1 - 2020/8/1

N2 - Analyzing new nationwide data from the Understanding Society COVID-19 survey (N = 10,336), this research examines intersecting ethnic and native–migrant inequalities in the impact of COVID-19 on people’s economic well-being in the UK. The results show that compared with white non-migrants, black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK are more likely to experience job loss during the COVID-19 lockdown, while BAME natives are less likely to enjoy employment protection such as furloughing. Although white non-migrants are more likely to reduce their work hours during the COVID-19 pandemic than BAME migrants, they are less likely to experience income loss and face increased financial hardship during the pandemic than BAME migrants. The findings show that the pandemic exacerbates entrenched socio-economic inequalities along intersecting ethnic and native–migrant lines. They urge governments and policy makers to place racial justice at the center of policy developments in response to the pandemic.

AB - Analyzing new nationwide data from the Understanding Society COVID-19 survey (N = 10,336), this research examines intersecting ethnic and native–migrant inequalities in the impact of COVID-19 on people’s economic well-being in the UK. The results show that compared with white non-migrants, black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK are more likely to experience job loss during the COVID-19 lockdown, while BAME natives are less likely to enjoy employment protection such as furloughing. Although white non-migrants are more likely to reduce their work hours during the COVID-19 pandemic than BAME migrants, they are less likely to experience income loss and face increased financial hardship during the pandemic than BAME migrants. The findings show that the pandemic exacerbates entrenched socio-economic inequalities along intersecting ethnic and native–migrant lines. They urge governments and policy makers to place racial justice at the center of policy developments in response to the pandemic.

KW - COVID-19

KW - Ethnicity

KW - Economic impact

KW - Inequality

KW - Intersectionality

KW - Migrant status

KW - UK

U2 - 10.1016/j.rssm.2020.100528

DO - 10.1016/j.rssm.2020.100528

M3 - Journal article

VL - 68

JO - Research in Social Stratification and Mobility

JF - Research in Social Stratification and Mobility

SN - 0276-5624

M1 - 100528

ER -