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Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating

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Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating. / Albrecht, T.; Mertens, S.F.L.; Ulstrup, J.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 129, No. 29, 2007, p. 9162-9167.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Albrecht, T, Mertens, SFL & Ulstrup, J 2007, 'Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 129, no. 29, pp. 9162-9167. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja072517h

APA

Albrecht, T., Mertens, S. F. L., & Ulstrup, J. (2007). Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 129(29), 9162-9167. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja072517h

Vancouver

Albrecht T, Mertens SFL, Ulstrup J. Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2007;129(29):9162-9167. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja072517h

Author

Albrecht, T. ; Mertens, S.F.L. ; Ulstrup, J. / Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2007 ; Vol. 129, No. 29. pp. 9162-9167.

Bibtex

@article{c8fc2f4e055a4c08a35e6b81f2e137cf,
title = "Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating",
abstract = "The electrochemical behavior of small metal nanoparticles is governed by Coulomb-like charging and equally spaced charge-transfer transitions. Using electrochemical gating at constant bias voltage, we show, for the first time, that individual nanoparticles can be operated as multistate switches in condensed media at room temperature, displaying distinct peak features in the tunneling current. The tunneling conductance increases with particle charge, suggesting that solvent reorganization and dielectric saturation become increasingly important. {\textcopyright} 2007 American Chemical Society.",
keywords = "Bias voltage, Charge transfer, Coulomb interactions, Electrochemistry, Nanoparticles, Switching systems, Charge transfer transitions, Electrochemical gating, Gold clusters, Metal nanoparticles, Gold compounds, gold, nanoparticle, article, conductance, electric potential, electrochemical analysis, electrochemistry, nanochemistry, room temperature, Algorithms, Catalysis, Electrodes, Electrons, Gold, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Platinum, Solvents, Spectrum Analysis",
author = "T. Albrecht and S.F.L. Mertens and J. Ulstrup",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1021/ja072517h",
language = "English",
volume = "129",
pages = "9162--9167",
journal = "Journal of the American Chemical Society",
issn = "0002-7863",
publisher = "AMER CHEMICAL SOC",
number = "29",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intrinsic multistate switching of gold clusters through electrochemical gating

AU - Albrecht, T.

AU - Mertens, S.F.L.

AU - Ulstrup, J.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - The electrochemical behavior of small metal nanoparticles is governed by Coulomb-like charging and equally spaced charge-transfer transitions. Using electrochemical gating at constant bias voltage, we show, for the first time, that individual nanoparticles can be operated as multistate switches in condensed media at room temperature, displaying distinct peak features in the tunneling current. The tunneling conductance increases with particle charge, suggesting that solvent reorganization and dielectric saturation become increasingly important. © 2007 American Chemical Society.

AB - The electrochemical behavior of small metal nanoparticles is governed by Coulomb-like charging and equally spaced charge-transfer transitions. Using electrochemical gating at constant bias voltage, we show, for the first time, that individual nanoparticles can be operated as multistate switches in condensed media at room temperature, displaying distinct peak features in the tunneling current. The tunneling conductance increases with particle charge, suggesting that solvent reorganization and dielectric saturation become increasingly important. © 2007 American Chemical Society.

KW - Bias voltage

KW - Charge transfer

KW - Coulomb interactions

KW - Electrochemistry

KW - Nanoparticles

KW - Switching systems

KW - Charge transfer transitions

KW - Electrochemical gating

KW - Gold clusters

KW - Metal nanoparticles

KW - Gold compounds

KW - gold

KW - nanoparticle

KW - article

KW - conductance

KW - electric potential

KW - electrochemical analysis

KW - electrochemistry

KW - nanochemistry

KW - room temperature

KW - Algorithms

KW - Catalysis

KW - Electrodes

KW - Electrons

KW - Gold

KW - Microscopy, Electron, Transmission

KW - Platinum

KW - Solvents

KW - Spectrum Analysis

U2 - 10.1021/ja072517h

DO - 10.1021/ja072517h

M3 - Journal article

VL - 129

SP - 9162

EP - 9167

JO - Journal of the American Chemical Society

JF - Journal of the American Chemical Society

SN - 0002-7863

IS - 29

ER -