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  • Keep moving forward. LEFT RIGHT LEFT_Accepted author manuscript

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Discourse, Context & Media. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Discourse, Context & Media, ??, ?, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.dcm.2017.09.012

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“Keep moving forward. LEFT RIGHT LEFT”: A critical metaphor analysis and addressivity analysis of personal and professional obesity blogs

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>9/10/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Discourse, Context and Media
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date9/10/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Blogs are a valuable information source for health researchers and individuals managing chronic conditions such as obesity. Yet, there is little research on obesity blogs with existing studies focusing on specific obesity-related issues or examining blogging as a weight loss tool. Even less is known about how the overall obesity experience is conceptualised by blogging individuals and medical experts (particularly via metaphor - a device that aids discussions of sensitive issues) or the addressivity and self-presentation strategies employed on an interactive platform which affords tailored identity construction. This study analysed 343 posts from six (personal and professional) obesity blogs using critical metaphor analysis and addressivity analysis. The preferred source domain of metaphors in both blog types was Journey - with potentially positive implications for doctor-patient communication. Across blogs, Journey metaphors were recruited to highlight similar aspects of obesity in ways that challenged the mainstream before-after weight loss narrative. In personal blogs, Journey metaphors were employed to present the authors as travellers; in professional blogs, as guides. Metaphors thus contributed to self-presentations consistent with traditional views of the doctor-patient relationship. Finally, while individuals used various addressivity strategies, medical experts preferred those that project professionalism.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Discourse, Context & Media. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Discourse, Context & Media, ??, ?, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.dcm.2017.09.012