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Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District: A GIS Approach

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter (peer-reviewed)

Published

Standard

Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District : A GIS Approach. / Gregory, Ian; Donaldson, Christopher; Taylor, Joanna.

Mapping Landscapes in Transformation: Multidisciplinary Methods for Historical Analysis . ed. / Thomas Coomans; Bieke Cattoor; Krista De Jonge. Leuven : Leuven University Press, 2019. p. 277–299.

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Gregory, I, Donaldson, C & Taylor, J 2019, Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District: A GIS Approach. in T Coomans, B Cattoor & K De Jonge (eds), Mapping Landscapes in Transformation: Multidisciplinary Methods for Historical Analysis . Leuven University Press, Leuven, pp. 277–299.

APA

Gregory, I., Donaldson, C., & Taylor, J. (2019). Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District: A GIS Approach. In T. Coomans, B. Cattoor, & K. De Jonge (Eds.), Mapping Landscapes in Transformation: Multidisciplinary Methods for Historical Analysis (pp. 277–299). Leuven University Press.

Vancouver

Gregory I, Donaldson C, Taylor J. Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District: A GIS Approach. In Coomans T, Cattoor B, De Jonge K, editors, Mapping Landscapes in Transformation: Multidisciplinary Methods for Historical Analysis . Leuven: Leuven University Press. 2019. p. 277–299

Author

Gregory, Ian ; Donaldson, Christopher ; Taylor, Joanna. / Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District : A GIS Approach. Mapping Landscapes in Transformation: Multidisciplinary Methods for Historical Analysis . editor / Thomas Coomans ; Bieke Cattoor ; Krista De Jonge. Leuven : Leuven University Press, 2019. pp. 277–299

Bibtex

@inbook{5011827e3b1f4919b9c911e04c21c0cb,
title = "Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District: A GIS Approach",
abstract = "There is a well-established tradition of historical geographers using geographical information systems (GIS) to study historic landscapes and, particularly, landscape transformation. Such studies tend to be based on quantitative sources and social science paradigms. This tendency is unsurprising, as the GIS data model is well suited to structuring analyses of quantitative sources with attribute data in tabular form linked to spatial data representing precisely located points, lines, or polygons. This chapter presents a new approach to the study of how landscapes were perceived in the past and how this changed over time. Implementing this approach requires a very different integration of GIS from the one used in previous studies because the sources involved are not quantitative: they are texts containing qualitative descriptions and, as such, need to be analysed using a mix of approaches that combine spatial analysis with close reading.",
author = "Ian Gregory and Christopher Donaldson and Joanna Taylor",
year = "2019",
month = jun
day = "19",
language = "English",
isbn = "9789462701731",
pages = "277–299",
editor = "Coomans, {Thomas } and Cattoor, {Bieke } and {De Jonge}, Krista",
booktitle = "Mapping Landscapes in Transformation",
publisher = "Leuven University Press",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Landscape Appreciation in the English Lake District

T2 - A GIS Approach

AU - Gregory, Ian

AU - Donaldson, Christopher

AU - Taylor, Joanna

PY - 2019/6/19

Y1 - 2019/6/19

N2 - There is a well-established tradition of historical geographers using geographical information systems (GIS) to study historic landscapes and, particularly, landscape transformation. Such studies tend to be based on quantitative sources and social science paradigms. This tendency is unsurprising, as the GIS data model is well suited to structuring analyses of quantitative sources with attribute data in tabular form linked to spatial data representing precisely located points, lines, or polygons. This chapter presents a new approach to the study of how landscapes were perceived in the past and how this changed over time. Implementing this approach requires a very different integration of GIS from the one used in previous studies because the sources involved are not quantitative: they are texts containing qualitative descriptions and, as such, need to be analysed using a mix of approaches that combine spatial analysis with close reading.

AB - There is a well-established tradition of historical geographers using geographical information systems (GIS) to study historic landscapes and, particularly, landscape transformation. Such studies tend to be based on quantitative sources and social science paradigms. This tendency is unsurprising, as the GIS data model is well suited to structuring analyses of quantitative sources with attribute data in tabular form linked to spatial data representing precisely located points, lines, or polygons. This chapter presents a new approach to the study of how landscapes were perceived in the past and how this changed over time. Implementing this approach requires a very different integration of GIS from the one used in previous studies because the sources involved are not quantitative: they are texts containing qualitative descriptions and, as such, need to be analysed using a mix of approaches that combine spatial analysis with close reading.

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 9789462701731

SP - 277

EP - 299

BT - Mapping Landscapes in Transformation

A2 - Coomans, Thomas

A2 - Cattoor, Bieke

A2 - De Jonge, Krista

PB - Leuven University Press

CY - Leuven

ER -