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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Brain and Language. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Brain and Language, 179, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2018.02.001

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Lexical olfaction recruits olfactory orbitofrontal cortex in metaphorical and literal contexts

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>04/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Brain and Language
Volume179
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)11-21
Publication statusPublished
Early online date23/02/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The investigation of specific lexical categories has substantially contributed to advancing
our knowledge on how meaning is neurally represented. One sensory domain that has received
particularly little attention is olfaction. This study aims to investigate the neural representation of lexical olfaction. In an fMRI experiment, participants read olfactory metaphors, their literal paraphrases, and literal olfactory sentences. Regions of interest were defined by a functional localizer run of odor processing. We observed activation in secondary olfactory areas during metaphorical and literal olfactory processing, thus extending previous findings to the novel source domain of olfaction.
Previously reported enhanced activation in emotion-related areas due to metaphoricity could not be replicated. Finally, no primary olfactory cortex was found active during lexical olfaction processing. We suggest that this absence is due to olfactory hedonicity being crucial to understand the meaning of the current olfactory expressions. Consequently, the processing of olfactory hedonicity recruits secondary olfactory areas.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Brain and Language. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Brain and Language, 179, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2018.02.001