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Life and death in English nursing homes : sequestration or transition?

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Life and death in English nursing homes : sequestration or transition? / Froggatt, Katherine A.

In: Ageing and Society, Vol. 21, No. 3, 05.2001, p. 319-332.

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Froggatt, Katherine A. / Life and death in English nursing homes : sequestration or transition?. In: Ageing and Society. 2001 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 319-332.

Bibtex

@article{bbf990edafc349ecadaef71e82784fd1,
title = "Life and death in English nursing homes : sequestration or transition?",
abstract = "Nursing homes as care institutions seek to offer a home where people can live until their death. A potential conflict, therefore, exists as nursing homes are both a place where life is lived and where death is regularly encountered. It has been proposed that within residential care homes for older people, dying individuals are separated from living people. Drawing on fieldwork undertaken in four English nursing homes the management of the dying process and the relationship between life and death is explored. There is much uncertainty inherent in the boundary between life and death for many residents in nursing homes. The relationship between life and death for these residents is less about the sequestration of dying people from living people, but rather the creation of transitional states between these two polarities.",
keywords = "Nursing homes, sequestration, death and dying, social death.",
author = "Froggatt, {Katherine A.}",
note = "http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASO The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Ageing and Society, 21 (3), pp 319-332 2001, {\circledC} 2001 Cambridge University Press.",
year = "2001",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1017/S0144686X0100825X",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "319--332",
journal = "Ageing and Society",
issn = "0144-686X",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Life and death in English nursing homes : sequestration or transition?

AU - Froggatt, Katherine A.

N1 - http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASO The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Ageing and Society, 21 (3), pp 319-332 2001, © 2001 Cambridge University Press.

PY - 2001/5

Y1 - 2001/5

N2 - Nursing homes as care institutions seek to offer a home where people can live until their death. A potential conflict, therefore, exists as nursing homes are both a place where life is lived and where death is regularly encountered. It has been proposed that within residential care homes for older people, dying individuals are separated from living people. Drawing on fieldwork undertaken in four English nursing homes the management of the dying process and the relationship between life and death is explored. There is much uncertainty inherent in the boundary between life and death for many residents in nursing homes. The relationship between life and death for these residents is less about the sequestration of dying people from living people, but rather the creation of transitional states between these two polarities.

AB - Nursing homes as care institutions seek to offer a home where people can live until their death. A potential conflict, therefore, exists as nursing homes are both a place where life is lived and where death is regularly encountered. It has been proposed that within residential care homes for older people, dying individuals are separated from living people. Drawing on fieldwork undertaken in four English nursing homes the management of the dying process and the relationship between life and death is explored. There is much uncertainty inherent in the boundary between life and death for many residents in nursing homes. The relationship between life and death for these residents is less about the sequestration of dying people from living people, but rather the creation of transitional states between these two polarities.

KW - Nursing homes

KW - sequestration

KW - death and dying

KW - social death.

U2 - 10.1017/S0144686X0100825X

DO - 10.1017/S0144686X0100825X

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 319

EP - 332

JO - Ageing and Society

JF - Ageing and Society

SN - 0144-686X

IS - 3

ER -