Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Links between action perception and action prod...

Associated organisational unit

Electronic data

  • 1-s2.0-S0028393217304189-main

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuropsychologia. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuropsychologia,126, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.11.005

    Accepted author manuscript, 705 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Links between action perception and action production in 10-week-old infants

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>18/03/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Neuropsychologia
Volume126
Number of pages6
Pages (from-to)69-74
Publication statusPublished
Early online date7/11/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Abstract In order to understand how experience of an action alters functional brain responses to visual information, we examined the effects of reflex walking on how 10-week-old infants processed biological motion. We gave experience of the reflex walk to half the participants, and did not give this experience to the other half of the sample. The participant's electrical brain activity in response to viewing upright and inverted walking and crawling movements indicated the detection of biological motion only for that group which experience the reflex walk, as evidenced by parietal electrode greater positivity for the upright than the inverted condition. This effect was observed only for the walking stimuli. This study suggests that parietal regions are associated with the perception of biological motion even at 9–11 weeks. Further, this result strongly suggests that experience refines the perception of biological motion and that at 10 weeks of age, the link between action perception and action production is tightly woven.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuropsychologia. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuropsychologia,126, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.11.005