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  • Egan et al 2016_Local policies to tackle a national problem_Health&Place_Authorfinalversion

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Health and Place. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Health and Place, 41, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.06.007

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Local policies to tackle a national problem: comparative qualitative case studies of an English local authority alcohol availability intervention

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Local policies to tackle a national problem : comparative qualitative case studies of an English local authority alcohol availability intervention. / Egan, Matt; Brennan, Alan; Buykx, Penny; De Vocht, Frank; Gavens, Lucy; Grace, Daniel; Halliday, Emma; Hickman, Matthew; Holt, Vivien; Mooney, John D.; Lock, Karen.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 41, 09.2016, p. 11-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Egan, M, Brennan, A, Buykx, P, De Vocht, F, Gavens, L, Grace, D, Halliday, E, Hickman, M, Holt, V, Mooney, JD & Lock, K 2016, 'Local policies to tackle a national problem: comparative qualitative case studies of an English local authority alcohol availability intervention', Health and Place, vol. 41, pp. 11-18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.06.007

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Author

Egan, Matt ; Brennan, Alan ; Buykx, Penny ; De Vocht, Frank ; Gavens, Lucy ; Grace, Daniel ; Halliday, Emma ; Hickman, Matthew ; Holt, Vivien ; Mooney, John D. ; Lock, Karen. / Local policies to tackle a national problem : comparative qualitative case studies of an English local authority alcohol availability intervention. In: Health and Place. 2016 ; Vol. 41. pp. 11-18.

Bibtex

@article{997e396e5f464556ab0bf69941392422,
title = "Local policies to tackle a national problem: comparative qualitative case studies of an English local authority alcohol availability intervention",
abstract = "Cumulative impact policies (CIPs) are widely used in UK local government to help regulate alcohol markets in localities characterised by high density of outlets and high rates of alcohol related harms. CIPs have been advocated as a means of protecting health by controlling or limiting alcohol availability. We use a comparative qualitative case study approach (n=5 English local government authorities, 48 participants) to assess how CIPs vary across different localities, what they are intended to achieve, and the implications for local-level alcohol availability. We found that the case study CIPs varied greatly in terms of aims, health focus and scale of implementation. However, they shared some common functions around influencing the types and managerial practices of alcohol outlets in specific neighbourhoods without reducing outlet density. The assumption that this will lead to alcohol harm-reduction needs to be quantitatively tested.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Neighbourhood environment, Public health, Case study",
author = "Matt Egan and Alan Brennan and Penny Buykx and {De Vocht}, Frank and Lucy Gavens and Daniel Grace and Emma Halliday and Matthew Hickman and Vivien Holt and Mooney, {John D.} and Karen Lock",
note = "This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Health and Place. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Health and Place, 41, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.06.007",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.06.007",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "11--18",
journal = "Health and Place",
issn = "1353-8292",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Local policies to tackle a national problem

T2 - comparative qualitative case studies of an English local authority alcohol availability intervention

AU - Egan, Matt

AU - Brennan, Alan

AU - Buykx, Penny

AU - De Vocht, Frank

AU - Gavens, Lucy

AU - Grace, Daniel

AU - Halliday, Emma

AU - Hickman, Matthew

AU - Holt, Vivien

AU - Mooney, John D.

AU - Lock, Karen

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Health and Place. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Health and Place, 41, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.06.007

PY - 2016/9

Y1 - 2016/9

N2 - Cumulative impact policies (CIPs) are widely used in UK local government to help regulate alcohol markets in localities characterised by high density of outlets and high rates of alcohol related harms. CIPs have been advocated as a means of protecting health by controlling or limiting alcohol availability. We use a comparative qualitative case study approach (n=5 English local government authorities, 48 participants) to assess how CIPs vary across different localities, what they are intended to achieve, and the implications for local-level alcohol availability. We found that the case study CIPs varied greatly in terms of aims, health focus and scale of implementation. However, they shared some common functions around influencing the types and managerial practices of alcohol outlets in specific neighbourhoods without reducing outlet density. The assumption that this will lead to alcohol harm-reduction needs to be quantitatively tested.

AB - Cumulative impact policies (CIPs) are widely used in UK local government to help regulate alcohol markets in localities characterised by high density of outlets and high rates of alcohol related harms. CIPs have been advocated as a means of protecting health by controlling or limiting alcohol availability. We use a comparative qualitative case study approach (n=5 English local government authorities, 48 participants) to assess how CIPs vary across different localities, what they are intended to achieve, and the implications for local-level alcohol availability. We found that the case study CIPs varied greatly in terms of aims, health focus and scale of implementation. However, they shared some common functions around influencing the types and managerial practices of alcohol outlets in specific neighbourhoods without reducing outlet density. The assumption that this will lead to alcohol harm-reduction needs to be quantitatively tested.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Neighbourhood environment

KW - Public health

KW - Case study

U2 - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.06.007

DO - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.06.007

M3 - Journal article

VL - 41

SP - 11

EP - 18

JO - Health and Place

JF - Health and Place

SN - 1353-8292

ER -