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Loss of the Kamin blocking effect in acute but not chronic schizophrenics.

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Loss of the Kamin blocking effect in acute but not chronic schizophrenics. / Jones, Steven H.; Gray, Jeffrey A.; Hemsley, David R.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 32, No. 9, 01.11.1992, p. 739-755.

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Jones, SH, Gray, JA & Hemsley, DR 1992, 'Loss of the Kamin blocking effect in acute but not chronic schizophrenics.', Biological Psychiatry, vol. 32, no. 9, pp. 739-755. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(92)90078-E

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Jones, Steven H. ; Gray, Jeffrey A. ; Hemsley, David R. / Loss of the Kamin blocking effect in acute but not chronic schizophrenics. In: Biological Psychiatry. 1992 ; Vol. 32, No. 9. pp. 739-755.

Bibtex

@article{975d12cd2e4e4c63bef7789c4a932bd3,
title = "Loss of the Kamin blocking effect in acute but not chronic schizophrenics.",
abstract = "Differences between research diagnostic criteria (RDC)-diagnosed acute and chronic schizophrenics and normal controls were studied using a Kamin blocking procedure. Blocking is an established animal learning procedure, thought by some researchers to reflect selective attention; decreased blocking indicates increased processing of irrelevant stimuli. It was predicted that this pattern would be obtained in acute schizophrenics, tested soon after admission, for two reasons: (1) evidence from previous clinical studies indicates that acute schizophrenics are more aware of nonsalient aspects of their environment than controls; and (2) blocking is disrupted in animals in a hyperdopaminergic state and restored by neuroleptic medication. This was the case: acute, but not chronic, schizophrenics showed disrupted blocking. This disruption was especially clear in those acute schizophrenics tested within 2 weeks of hospital admission. By the second test session (in a cross-over design), there was some evidence of normalization in performance in the acute schizophrenics. These findings are considered with regard to the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.",
author = "Jones, {Steven H.} and Gray, {Jeffrey A.} and Hemsley, {David R.}",
year = "1992",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0006-3223(92)90078-E",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "739--755",
journal = "Biological Psychiatry",
issn = "0006-3223",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Loss of the Kamin blocking effect in acute but not chronic schizophrenics.

AU - Jones, Steven H.

AU - Gray, Jeffrey A.

AU - Hemsley, David R.

PY - 1992/11/1

Y1 - 1992/11/1

N2 - Differences between research diagnostic criteria (RDC)-diagnosed acute and chronic schizophrenics and normal controls were studied using a Kamin blocking procedure. Blocking is an established animal learning procedure, thought by some researchers to reflect selective attention; decreased blocking indicates increased processing of irrelevant stimuli. It was predicted that this pattern would be obtained in acute schizophrenics, tested soon after admission, for two reasons: (1) evidence from previous clinical studies indicates that acute schizophrenics are more aware of nonsalient aspects of their environment than controls; and (2) blocking is disrupted in animals in a hyperdopaminergic state and restored by neuroleptic medication. This was the case: acute, but not chronic, schizophrenics showed disrupted blocking. This disruption was especially clear in those acute schizophrenics tested within 2 weeks of hospital admission. By the second test session (in a cross-over design), there was some evidence of normalization in performance in the acute schizophrenics. These findings are considered with regard to the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.

AB - Differences between research diagnostic criteria (RDC)-diagnosed acute and chronic schizophrenics and normal controls were studied using a Kamin blocking procedure. Blocking is an established animal learning procedure, thought by some researchers to reflect selective attention; decreased blocking indicates increased processing of irrelevant stimuli. It was predicted that this pattern would be obtained in acute schizophrenics, tested soon after admission, for two reasons: (1) evidence from previous clinical studies indicates that acute schizophrenics are more aware of nonsalient aspects of their environment than controls; and (2) blocking is disrupted in animals in a hyperdopaminergic state and restored by neuroleptic medication. This was the case: acute, but not chronic, schizophrenics showed disrupted blocking. This disruption was especially clear in those acute schizophrenics tested within 2 weeks of hospital admission. By the second test session (in a cross-over design), there was some evidence of normalization in performance in the acute schizophrenics. These findings are considered with regard to the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.

U2 - 10.1016/0006-3223(92)90078-E

DO - 10.1016/0006-3223(92)90078-E

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 739

EP - 755

JO - Biological Psychiatry

JF - Biological Psychiatry

SN - 0006-3223

IS - 9

ER -