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Maritime Cyberpower Projection

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Maritime Cyberpower Projection. / Venables, Adrian.

In: Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal, Vol. 14, 01.05.2017, p. 15-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Venables, A 2017, 'Maritime Cyberpower Projection', Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal, vol. 14, pp. 15-28.

APA

Venables, A. (2017). Maritime Cyberpower Projection. Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal, 14, 15-28.

Vancouver

Venables A. Maritime Cyberpower Projection. Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal. 2017 May 1;14:15-28.

Author

Venables, Adrian. / Maritime Cyberpower Projection. In: Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 14. pp. 15-28.

Bibtex

@article{72622e8f1c31464cae0400397fe4ebc9,
title = "Maritime Cyberpower Projection",
abstract = "UK military doctrine recognises five operating environments, Maritime, Land, Air, Space and Cyberspace. These are not regarded as totally separate warfighting arms as demonstrated by the use of amphibious troops, maritime aviation and the use of satellite derived communications and intelligence illustrating how naval forces can utilise the distinctive attributes of other environments in the projection of seapower. This paper examines the as yet unexplored area of how cyberspace can be used as a mechanism by which the maritime environment can generate cyberpower to influence a target population afloat or ashore. The maritime and cyber environments have manysimilar characteristics such as their dependence on manufactured resources to exploit their potential and that their size prevents them from being under the total control of a single power, but that temporary regional control is vital for trade, communication or to achieve an effect on an adversary{\textquoteright}s behaviour. By examining the components of cyberspace that are dependent uponthe maritime environment, methods to identify the components that can project the new concepts of maritime cyberpower and cyber seapower are explored with particular emphasis on addressing the potential cyber vulnerabilities of ship systems. ",
keywords = "cyberpower, Maritime, Maritime Security",
author = "Adrian Venables",
year = "2017",
month = may
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "15--28",
journal = "Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal",
issn = "2242-441X",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maritime Cyberpower Projection

AU - Venables, Adrian

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - UK military doctrine recognises five operating environments, Maritime, Land, Air, Space and Cyberspace. These are not regarded as totally separate warfighting arms as demonstrated by the use of amphibious troops, maritime aviation and the use of satellite derived communications and intelligence illustrating how naval forces can utilise the distinctive attributes of other environments in the projection of seapower. This paper examines the as yet unexplored area of how cyberspace can be used as a mechanism by which the maritime environment can generate cyberpower to influence a target population afloat or ashore. The maritime and cyber environments have manysimilar characteristics such as their dependence on manufactured resources to exploit their potential and that their size prevents them from being under the total control of a single power, but that temporary regional control is vital for trade, communication or to achieve an effect on an adversary’s behaviour. By examining the components of cyberspace that are dependent uponthe maritime environment, methods to identify the components that can project the new concepts of maritime cyberpower and cyber seapower are explored with particular emphasis on addressing the potential cyber vulnerabilities of ship systems.

AB - UK military doctrine recognises five operating environments, Maritime, Land, Air, Space and Cyberspace. These are not regarded as totally separate warfighting arms as demonstrated by the use of amphibious troops, maritime aviation and the use of satellite derived communications and intelligence illustrating how naval forces can utilise the distinctive attributes of other environments in the projection of seapower. This paper examines the as yet unexplored area of how cyberspace can be used as a mechanism by which the maritime environment can generate cyberpower to influence a target population afloat or ashore. The maritime and cyber environments have manysimilar characteristics such as their dependence on manufactured resources to exploit their potential and that their size prevents them from being under the total control of a single power, but that temporary regional control is vital for trade, communication or to achieve an effect on an adversary’s behaviour. By examining the components of cyberspace that are dependent uponthe maritime environment, methods to identify the components that can project the new concepts of maritime cyberpower and cyber seapower are explored with particular emphasis on addressing the potential cyber vulnerabilities of ship systems.

KW - cyberpower

KW - Maritime

KW - Maritime Security

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 15

EP - 28

JO - Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal

JF - Maritime Interdiction Operations Journal

SN - 2242-441X

ER -