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Music education training in UK Conservatoires and Universities - learning how to teach

Research output: Contribution to conference - Without ISBN/ISSN Poster

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Music education training in UK Conservatoires and Universities - learning how to teach. / Shirley, Rachel.

2017. Poster session presented at NAMHE Conference 2017, .

Research output: Contribution to conference - Without ISBN/ISSN Poster

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@conference{00494af43b6d443ea047cd0c00c261be,
title = "Music education training in UK Conservatoires and Universities - learning how to teach",
abstract = "Most musicians are involved in educating others at some point in their career, with around 60{\%} actively teaching at any one time. A conservatoire or university music degree is often regarded as sufficient qualification for instrumental teaching. Teaching education provision at UK conservatoires has “improved massively over the last 20 years”. However, Henley (2011) recommends that conservatoires improve teaching qualifications and experience, in order to meet the needs of music education in the UK. This study summarises the provision of training in music teaching at UK conservatoires and universities, summarising the available undergraduate modules and their content, and considers whether this training is ‘fit for purpose’, using the topic of teaching adults as an example.",
keywords = "Music education, music, Adult learning",
author = "Rachel Shirley",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
note = "NAMHE Conference 2017 ; Conference date: 02-05-2017",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - Music education training in UK Conservatoires and Universities - learning how to teach

AU - Shirley, Rachel

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Most musicians are involved in educating others at some point in their career, with around 60% actively teaching at any one time. A conservatoire or university music degree is often regarded as sufficient qualification for instrumental teaching. Teaching education provision at UK conservatoires has “improved massively over the last 20 years”. However, Henley (2011) recommends that conservatoires improve teaching qualifications and experience, in order to meet the needs of music education in the UK. This study summarises the provision of training in music teaching at UK conservatoires and universities, summarising the available undergraduate modules and their content, and considers whether this training is ‘fit for purpose’, using the topic of teaching adults as an example.

AB - Most musicians are involved in educating others at some point in their career, with around 60% actively teaching at any one time. A conservatoire or university music degree is often regarded as sufficient qualification for instrumental teaching. Teaching education provision at UK conservatoires has “improved massively over the last 20 years”. However, Henley (2011) recommends that conservatoires improve teaching qualifications and experience, in order to meet the needs of music education in the UK. This study summarises the provision of training in music teaching at UK conservatoires and universities, summarising the available undergraduate modules and their content, and considers whether this training is ‘fit for purpose’, using the topic of teaching adults as an example.

KW - Music education

KW - music

KW - Adult learning

M3 - Poster

ER -